Tag Archive for 'windows'

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TortoiseSVN 1.7.8 Released

If you’ve been following our community polls, you’ll know that TortoiseSVN came top in our poll of the most popular clients for Apache Subversion users, so we’re pleased to announce that the latest version is now available through the WANdisco website.

TortoiseSVN 1.7.8 is linked against the just released Apache Subversion 1.7.6 release, which features optimized ‘svn upgrade’ performance on large working copies, and fixes for the output of ‘svn propget -R’ ‘svn proplist’ and ‘svn status,’ amongst other enhancements. TortoiseSVN 1.7.8 comes with a list of fixes, including fixes for a crash in repobrowser that could occur when refreshing, a fix for an incorrect handling of long paths, and more. The full list of changes can be found in the TortoiseSVN Changelog.

If you want to find out more about what TortoiseSVN has to offer, why not take a look at our ‘Top Ten Reasons To Try TortoiseSVN’ blog post?

Need more Subversion know-how? After getting a great response from the Apache Subversion community in 2011, Subversion Live is back for 2012, bringing the Subversion community sessions covering everything from Subversion’s future, to expert-led best practices workshops, as well as the unique opportunity to meet the core Subversion committers.

Poll: Which OS is Most Popular for a Subversion Server?

If you’ve been paying attention to our Apache Subversion community polls, you’ll already have spotted last month’s poll on Subversion clients (and the answer!) This raised questions about what platform users are running their Subversion server on, so in this month’s poll we’re setting out to discover what’s the most popular operating system amongst Subversion users.

Let us know, by answering our quick poll! We’ll publish the results in a few weeks, so be sure to keep checking back to see how your Subversion usage compares to the rest of the community.

Looking for a cross-platform ‘Subversion Made Easy’ solution? uberSVN is free to download and free to use. Visit http://www.wandisco.com/ubersvn/download to get started, or Learn More.

WANdisco’s July Roundup

As an active member of the ASF and Apache Subversion communities, this month we were excited to announce that our sponsorship of the Apache Software Foundation will continue for a second year in a row. As an ASF sponsor WANdisco joins companies such as Google, Facebook, Yahoo!, HP and IBM.

The ASF Sponsorship Program is the official avenue for substantial, non-directed monetary contributions to the ASF, and funds raised through this program help the Foundation maintain leadership in the developer and open source communities.

Not content with continuing and upgrading our sponsorship, we increased the number of full-time Subversion committers by hiring two of the most experienced Subversion engineers in Branko Čibej and Stefan Fuhrmann. Branko Čibej joined the Subversion project in May 2000 and has been an active member of the community since then. He will take up the role of Director of Subversion at WANdisco.

“Apache Subversion is entering an interesting phase in its development,” said Branko. “The changes in the latest release have laid the groundwork for a slew of important new features, and I’m grateful to WANdisco for giving me the opportunity to work full-time on the project as their Director of Subversion.”

Also joining WANdisco as a full-time Subversion developer is Stefan Fuhrmann. Stefan has been involved in the Apache Subversion project since 2010, and has worked on the TortoiseSVN project since 2003.

We also saw two IBM veterans – Paul Hewitt and Scott Rudenstein –join WANdisco’s sales management team. Paul Hewitt brings more than 25 years of software industry experience to his new position as WANdisco’s Sales Director for EMEA. Paul spent 10 of those 25 years at IBM Telelogic where he rose from the rank of Principal Account Manager to become UK Managing Director and Senior Vice President for Western Europe. After assuming this leadership position, Paul was able to grow Telelogic’s revenue by more than 50%.

Meanwhile, Scott Rudenstein brings over 20 years of industry experience to his new position as Director of Technical Sales and Services at WANdisco. Scott spent over 5 years as a Senior Sales Engineer in the IBM Rational Software Group specialising in software development tools. Scott was a member of the Rational Software team that was acquired by IBM for $2.1bn in February 2003. Scott has also held various Sales Director positions at US-based software companies such as Quest Software and Surgient.

We’d like to take this opportunity to welcome all our new starters to WANdisco! Want to join them? There’s still plenty of job opportunities at our Careers page.

This month, we set out to investigate which Apache Subversion client is most popular, with a poll that asked what clients – if any – the SVN community are using. The results are in and, according to respondents, there’s a clear winner in this popularity contest as over 60% of respondents said they were using TortoiseSVN.

TortoiseSVN is a free Windows client for Subversion – if you want to find out more about what TortoiseSVN has to offer, why not take a look at our ‘Top Ten Reasons To Try TortoiseSVN’ blog post? If you want to find out what all the fuss is about for yourself, we also have a handy starter guide: ‘How to Install TortoiseSVN and Make Your First Repository Change.’

After the success of 2011’s conference, Subversion Live is back for 2012! Subversion Live 2012 will take place in San Francisco (October 10th & 11th) Greenwich, Connecticut (October 16th & 17th) and London (October 23rd & 24th) and for a limited period registrants can get a 25% discount with our Early Bird offer.

This series of two-day conferences will feature a unique mix of expert-led best practices workshops, live Subversion demos and invaluable networking opportunities with experienced peers. Attendees will also have the opportunity to meet core Subversion committers, including Greg Stein, Stefan Fuhrmann, Julian Foad and Philip Martin.

Registration is now open – and don’t forget to enter the ‘earlybird’ code to claim your 25% discount.

After more training, but can’t wait until Subversion Live 2012? After getting plenty of requests from the community for more webinars on branching and merging, not only have we added another free training webinar on branching and merging but we’ve created some handy Subversion refcards.

Introduction to Merging in Apache Subversion’ starts with the basic question of ‘what is merging,’ before showing you how to perform the different types of merges, including reverse merges, and finally sharing some best practices to help you avoid merge hell, while ‘Introduction to Branching in Apache Subversion’ covers the essential know-how you need to get started with branching. This refcard covers:

  • What is a Branch?
  • How to Create a Branch
  • Identifying Branches
  • Deleting Branches

We’ll be adding more refcards over the coming weeks, so keep checking back for even more free training content.

Poll Results: Which Subversion Client Do You Use?

There’s no shortage of clients for Apache Subversion, each with its own combination of functionality, integration capabilities, and target platforms. But which client is the most popular with the SVN community? We recently ran a poll to find out and, after getting a great response, the results are in and there’s a clear winner…

Over 60% of respondents said they used TortoiseSVN, an SVN client for the Windows operating system.

It’s easy to see why TortoiseSVN is so popular with the community: not only does its context-sensitive menu integrate seamlessly with Windows shell, but it allows users to see the status of their files at a glance, thanks to its handy icon overlays. And, of course, just like Subversion it’s an established open source project with the option of professional support, for those who need some extra help with their implementation.

The poll also revealed the popularity of Subversion clients in general, with less than 5% of respondents saying they do not use a client.

Thank you to everyone who took part in our poll and if there’s a question you’d like to pose to the Subversion community, don’t hesitate to contact us with your ideas and we’ll try to feature them in future polls.

If you want to find out more about what TortoiseSVN has to offer, why not take a look at our ‘Top Ten Reasons To Try TortoiseSVN’ blog post? If you want to find out what all the fuss is about for yourself, we also have a handy starter guide: ‘How to Install TortoiseSVN and Make Your First Repository Change.’

Subversion Tip of the Week

TortoiseSVN Properties: Log Messages

In addition to the standard properties of Apache Subversion, TortoiseSVN has a few unique ‘tsvn’ properties.

1) To access these properties, select the ‘Properties’ option from the TortoiseSVN menu.

2) This will bring up the ‘properties’ dialog. In this example, we’ll be adding a new property, so select ‘New.’

3) To set parameters for the log messages, select ‘Log sizes’ from the drop-down menu.

4) In the subsequent dialog, you will be able to set the following parameters:

Minimum number of chars for a commit message – TortoiseSVN will block a commit with a log message shorter than the characters specified here. This is useful to ensure that all members of your team use appropriate log messages.

Minimum number of chars for a lock message – TortoiseSVN will block any attempts to lock a file/folder with a message shorter than is specified here. This property reminds all team members to supply a message when locking a file/folder.

Char position where to show a border line in commit text boxes – This option is useful when log messages need to be formatted with some maximum width before a line break. Tip: setting this feature to a value other than zero, will only work if you have a fixed-width front selected for log messages.

5) Enter your values and click ‘Ok.’

6) Your parameters will automatically be entered into the ‘Properties’ dialog. Click ‘Ok’ to save them.

7) You have now successfully set the ‘tsvn:logminsize’ and ‘tsvn:lockmsgminsize’ properties. When committing a change to the repository, you will be unable to select the ‘Ok’ button until you have entered an appropriate log message.

8) Once you’ve added a log message, you will be able to select the ‘Ok’ button and complete your commit.

Our Support Engineers are the Sherpas of Source Control Management! Just as traditional Sherpas use their deep knowledge of local terrain to assist mountain climbers in reaching the highest peaks and avoiding pitfalls along the way, WANdisco’s Subversion Sherpas use their extensive experience to guide customers away from problems and enable them to get the most out of Subversion. Find out how our Sherpas can help you!

Subversion Tip of the Week

Editing Log Messages

At some point, you may wish to add, delete, or alter the information contained within the log messages from previous revisions. This is made easy with TortoiseSVN.

Tip: The ability to edit log messages is disabled by default. To enable it, modify the pre-revprop-change hook, which can be found in the “hooks” folder of your repository.

1) To get started, select the ‘Show log’ option from the TortoiseSVN menu.

2) In the ‘Log messages’ dialog, right-click on the desired revision and select ‘Edit log message.’

3) You can now edit the revision’s log message. Once you are happy with the changes, click ‘Ok’ to save them.

Our Support Engineers are the Sherpas of Source Control Management! Just as traditional Sherpas use their deep knowledge of local terrain to assist mountain climbers in reaching the highest peaks and avoiding pitfalls along the way, WANdisco’s Subversion Sherpas use their extensive experience to guide customers away from problems and enable them to get the most out of Subversion. Our ‘Team Sherpa’ consists of highly skilled support engineers and core Subversion developers who have been working on the Subversion project since it began, and are also uniquely positioned to help you migrate to the latest and greatest releases of SVN. You can hire one of our Subversion Sherpas today, by visiting http://www.wandisco.com/subversion/support

Intro to Command Line Subversion

While Subversion graphical clients such as TortoiseSVN are popular for quickly getting to grips with version control, it is also possible to interact with Subversion directly from the command line. Although graphical clients have their advantages, it is also useful to have the option of command line version control. In this post, we will cover the basics of command line Subversion by creating a repository, getting a working copy, and committing changes back to the repository.

SVN commands are entered via a terminal window. To open this in Windows, press the “Windows key” and “r.” Enter ‘cmd’ in the ‘Run Dialog box,’ and hit ‘OK.’

This will open the terminal.

To create your first repository, you must enter the ‘svnadmin create’ command, followed by the location where you wish to create the repository, and the name of the new repository:

svn admin create (location) (repository name)

In this example, we will create a repository called ‘Test’ in the Documents folder:

Hit ‘Enter’ and close the terminal window. You will notice that a new ‘Test’ folder has now been created in the Documents folder.

When you open this folder, you will see some new files.

The next step is to checkout a working copy. This is done using the ‘SVN Checkout’ command, followed by the URL of your repository, and the location you wish to copy your files to:

svn checkout (URL) (location)

Press ‘Enter.’ Now, when you check your local repository, you will see copies of all the files from your repository.

Now you are free to make changes to the files in your working copy. It is good practice to regularly update your working copy with any changes that have been made in the repository, to help avoid running into conflicts when you eventually commit your changes. An update is performed using the ‘svn update’ command, followed by the location of the working copy:

svn update (location)

Once you have finished working on the files, you can commit your changes to the repository. This is done using the ‘svn commit’ command, followed by the “–message” command and a log message explaining your changes, and finally, the location of your working copy:

svn commit –message “log message” (location)

Hit ‘Enter.’ If the commit is successful, you will see a dialog similar to the one below:

Your changes have now been successfully committed to the repository!

Subversion Tip of the Week

TortoiseSVN Quickstart

TortoiseSVN is a popular Windows client for Apache Subversion, that makes version control easy! This week, we will cover all the basic TortoiseSVN operations in six easy steps.

1) The first step, is to checkout a working copy. Open the location on your hard drive where you wish to create your working copy, right-click and select ‘SVN Checkout.’

2) In the Checkout dialog, enter the URL of your repository and click ‘Ok.’

3) TortoiseSVN will now checkout a working copy. Click ‘Ok.’

4) Make some changes to your working copy. Note that if these changes include creating new files, you must ‘Add’ them to TortoiseSVN before they are placed under version control.

5) Once you have finished making your changes, click ‘SVN Commit…’ to commit your changes back to the repository.

6) Another essential function for your TortoiseSVN development, is ‘SVN Update.’ This command pulls updates from the repository into your working copy, reducing the chances of encountering merge conflicts when you perform your own commits. This is made easy with TortoiseSVN, simply select the ‘SVN Update’ option from the Windows context menu.

And that’s it! You’re now ready to continue making changes to your working copy, and committing them back to the repository, while running regular ‘SVN Updates’ to ensure all the latest repository changes are pulled into your working copy.

Need some extra help with your TortoiseSVN installation? We provide professional support for TortoiseSVN

Our Support Engineers are the Sherpas of Source Control Management! Just as traditional Sherpas use their deep knowledge of local terrain to assist mountain climbers in reaching the highest peaks and avoiding pitfalls along the way, WANdisco’s Subversion Sherpas use their extensive experience to guide customers away from problems and enable them to get the most out of Subversion. Our ‘Team Sherpa’ consists of highly skilled support engineers and core Subversion developers who have been working on the Subversion project since it began, and are also uniquely positioned to help you migrate to the latest and greatest releases of SVN. You can hire one of our Subversion Sherpas today, by visiting http://www.wandisco.com/subversion/support

Apache Subversion 1.7.1 Released

It’s been less than two weeks since the Apache Subversion community celebrated the release of Subversion 1.7, a major update for the Subversion project that delivered both new client tools and some long-awaited client-side performance improvements. Thanks to rapid feedback from Subversion’s early adopters and the hard work of the Subversion community, Subversion 1.7.1 is already available.

Apache Subversion 1.7.1 contains a list of important user-visible and developer-visible changes, including an FSFS sanity check to prevent corruption seen in the wild, and improvements to the performance of both ‘svn info’ and hash table sorting, and improvements to the memory usage in merge.

Other important fixes in 1.7.1 include:

  • a fix for a memory leak in ‘merge –reintegrate.
  • a fix for an invalid assertion in merge.
  • a fix for upgrading WCs containing authz-restricted dirs.
  • updated bash completion for 1.7.
  • fixed handling of directories after ‘update –set-depth=empty
  • make ‘svn ls’ continue to work with 1.0-1.3 repos.

More information on the fixes and enhancements, is available in the Changes file. This is the most complete Subversion release to date, and users are encouraged to upgrade to this release as soon as possible. As part of our commitment to the Subversion community, fully-tested, certified, open source 1.7.1 binaries can be downloaded from WANdisco now. Subversion 1.7.1 is also available through our free, uberSVN platform for Subversion.

The TortoiseSVN Windows client has also upgraded to 1.7.1, featuring fixes in both TortoiseSVN and the underlying Subversion library. TortoiseSVN 1.7.1 can also be downloaded directly from the WANdisco website.

How to Install TortoiseSVN and Make Your First Repository Change

This is an introduction to Subversion, using WANdisco’s uberSVN and the trusty Windows client, TortoiseSVN. In fact, you can think of this tutorial as a set of TortoiseSVN water wings, aimed at developers who have been thrown into Subversion at the deep end. As well as getting TortoiseSVN installed, it’ll show you how to get your working copy in place and your first changes made to the repository.

1) Download the latest version of TortoiseSVN

http://www.wandisco.com/subversion/download#tortoise

2) Double click the installer file.

3) Click the Run button.

4) You’ll see the welcome screen, which will confirm the version of Tortoise that you’re about to install. Click Next >

5) Read the End-User License Agreement. If you’re happy to proceed, click the ‘I accept the terms…’ radio button and then click Next >.

6) The Custom Setup screen lets you deselect various elements of the install. Unless you are really low on disk space, it isn’t worth worrying about this. When you’re ready to continue, click Next >

7) Click Install.

8 ) Hey presto! Tortoise is now installed. Click Finish.

9) To work with a Subversion repository we first need to download a local copy (called a working copy) of either the full or part of the repository. We start by creating a directory in which we’ll store the working copy.

10) Open Windows Explorer, go to the new directory and right click within the folder space. The Explorer context menu appears, along with Subversion commands that are added with TortoiseSVN. Click on the option ‘SVN Checkout.’

  • URL Repository: This is the URL of the repository on which you want to work. This is the address of the repository, or portion of a repository for which you want to make a working copy. You can get the repository URL from the repository’s screen in uberSVN.
  • Checkout directory: This is the location on your local file system where the checkout will occur. By default it will be the location that you’re currently focused on in Explorer, however you can change it here.
  • Checkout Depth: The Checkout Depth drop-down allows you to limit what you checkout. Useful if you only want to make a change in one directory of a very large repository.
  • Revision: You can get the latest version of the repository, called ‘HEAD’ (most up-to-date version), or select a specific revision to go back to a version before particular changes.
  • When you’ve finished with these options and you’re ready to do the checkout, click OK.

11) You’ll now see the progress of the checkout. All files and folders that are included in the checkout will be logged.

12) Next, it’s time to make a change. The working copy is now in place on your computer, ready to edit and change to your heart’s desire. One of the benefits of Tortoise as a shell replacement is the fact that it can overlay repository files with status icons that tell you the current state of each file.

13) We’ll now make a change to a file. In this example the file ‘system.txt’ will be modified and saved.

14) You’ll notice that once saved, ‘system.txt’ now has a different icon overlain, showing an exclamation mark in a red circle to denote that it has been changed.

15) Having tested the change, it’s time to add it to the repository. To apply changes to the repository that you’ve made in your local copy you need to use the SVN Commit command. You can select individual files or their directories, then right click to get the context menu. On the menu, click SVN Commit….

16) You’ll be prompted for a message to associate with the changes you’ve made. It’s human nature to try to leave this blank because you’re in a hurry and can’t be bothered, but simple log messages can really help with troubleshooting problems at a later date.

17) The outcome of the commit will appear in a dialog window. If the commit was successful the repository’s revision number will increase. Click OK. That’s it, you’re working with version control.

18) Next we’ll add something new to the repository. You see, it’s not possible to commit something unless Subversion already has a record of the file you are adding. So first, right click the file and choose Add… from the Subversion commands.

19) The added elements should now appear in Explorer with the ‘added’ overlay icon. Although Subversion now knows about the file, you still need to perform a commit. So again, right click the file and choose SVN Commit… from the menu.

20) It’s always good practise to leave a note, whenever you do a commit. While Subversion gives you lots of tools for scrutinizing file changes, it’s nice to have a quick summary to look back on. To complete the commit, click OK.

21) You’ll get a log of the commit, confirming that your new files are now part of the new repository revision.

22) That’s all there is to using Subversion with the TortoiseSVN client. Probably 90% of the work you need to do is covered here. If you get stuck though, don’t forget that you can read the user guide by clicking on the Help link in the TortoiseSVN commands menu.

Tips:

  • Checkout only what you need. If you include a subdirectory in the address, the checkout will ignore anything in the repository that is above the directory. This is very useful as it lets you quickly checkout a small part of a repository that might take a really long time to copy. e.g:
  • Checkout the whole repository: http://10.2.5.2:9880/zelle/
  • Checkout just a directory: http://10.2.5.2:9880/zelle/trunk/genshla01/
  • Checkout just a file: Alas, you can’t. Subversion needs to organize working copy data using directories as its own ‘housekeeping’ data needs to live in a hidden subdirectory. There would be no opportunity to create a subdirectory if you checked out only a file. The workaround is to use the “Checkout Depth” option to checkout only directories, then perform selective updates on the things you need.