Tag Archive for 'tortoisesvn'

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TortoiseSVN 1.7.8 Released

If you’ve been following our community polls, you’ll know that TortoiseSVN came top in our poll of the most popular clients for Apache Subversion users, so we’re pleased to announce that the latest version is now available through the WANdisco website.

TortoiseSVN 1.7.8 is linked against the just released Apache Subversion 1.7.6 release, which features optimized ‘svn upgrade’ performance on large working copies, and fixes for the output of ‘svn propget -R’ ‘svn proplist’ and ‘svn status,’ amongst other enhancements. TortoiseSVN 1.7.8 comes with a list of fixes, including fixes for a crash in repobrowser that could occur when refreshing, a fix for an incorrect handling of long paths, and more. The full list of changes can be found in the TortoiseSVN Changelog.

If you want to find out more about what TortoiseSVN has to offer, why not take a look at our ‘Top Ten Reasons To Try TortoiseSVN’ blog post?

Need more Subversion know-how? After getting a great response from the Apache Subversion community in 2011, Subversion Live is back for 2012, bringing the Subversion community sessions covering everything from Subversion’s future, to expert-led best practices workshops, as well as the unique opportunity to meet the core Subversion committers.

New Refcards: All About Subversion Checkouts and Commits

Need an intro to some essential Apache Subversion commands? We got such great feedback from last month’s branching and merging refcards, that we’ve already put together two more free refcards for the Subversion community.

All About the Apache Subversion Commit Command’ covers everything from the basic “what is a commit?” to more advanced information on editing log messages, ignoring files and directories, and an intro to hook scripts.

Meanwhile, ‘All About Checkouts’ provides a quick reference to making full use of the checkout command and understanding the messages generated under different scenarios. This refcard covers:

  • What is a checkout?
  • Performing a checkout from the command line
  • Performing a checkout with TortoiseSVN
  • How to create a nested folder
  • Changing the checkout file data

We’ve got even more refcards lined up for the coming weeks, so be sure to keep checking back for all the latest free training content. And if you’ve got an idea for a Subversion refcard, please don’t hesitate to Contact Us.

Need more Subversion know-how? After getting a great response from the Apache Subversion community in 2011, Subversion Live is back for 2012, bringing the Subversion community sessions covering everything from Subversion’s future, to expert-led best practices workshops, as well as the unique opportunity to meet the core Subversion committers.

Poll: Which OS is Most Popular for a Subversion Server?

If you’ve been paying attention to our Apache Subversion community polls, you’ll already have spotted last month’s poll on Subversion clients (and the answer!) This raised questions about what platform users are running their Subversion server on, so in this month’s poll we’re setting out to discover what’s the most popular operating system amongst Subversion users.

Let us know, by answering our quick poll! We’ll publish the results in a few weeks, so be sure to keep checking back to see how your Subversion usage compares to the rest of the community.

Looking for a cross-platform ‘Subversion Made Easy’ solution? uberSVN is free to download and free to use. Visit http://www.wandisco.com/ubersvn/download to get started, or Learn More.

Subversion Tip of the Week

Changelists : Bring Some Order to your Working Copy

When modifying a working copy with TortoiseSVN, it can be useful to pinpoint exactly which files you’ve changed, and which files have been changed and committed by others, before you perform a commit. TortoiseSVN has a ‘Check for Modifications’ function especially for this.

1) Start by selecting the ‘Check for Modifications…’ option from the TortoiseSVN menu.

2) This will bring up a dialog displaying every file that has been changed in your working copy, with colour coding to highlight the status.

3) By default, all the modified files will appear in an unordered list. If you have been working on unrelated tasks simultaneously, it may be useful to define which modified files are related to which task, by organizing your files into changelists. To group your files in the ‘Check for Modifications…’ dialog, highlight the files you wish to organize into a changelist, right-click and select ‘Move to changelist.’

4) From here, you can select an existing changelist or create a new changelist. In this example, we’ll create a new changelist. When prompted, enter a name for your changelist and click ‘Ok.’

Need more Subversion know-how? After getting a great response from the Apache Subversion community in 2011, Subversion Live is back for 2012, bringing the Subversion community sessions covering everything from Subversion’s future, to expert-led best practices workshops, as well as the unique opportunity to meet the core Subversion committers. We’re currently running a very special early bird offer: register now using the ‘earlybird’ code to get a 25% discount (note, the early bird offer ends 10th August, so you better be quick!)

WANdisco’s July Roundup

As an active member of the ASF and Apache Subversion communities, this month we were excited to announce that our sponsorship of the Apache Software Foundation will continue for a second year in a row. As an ASF sponsor WANdisco joins companies such as Google, Facebook, Yahoo!, HP and IBM.

The ASF Sponsorship Program is the official avenue for substantial, non-directed monetary contributions to the ASF, and funds raised through this program help the Foundation maintain leadership in the developer and open source communities.

Not content with continuing and upgrading our sponsorship, we increased the number of full-time Subversion committers by hiring two of the most experienced Subversion engineers in Branko Čibej and Stefan Fuhrmann. Branko Čibej joined the Subversion project in May 2000 and has been an active member of the community since then. He will take up the role of Director of Subversion at WANdisco.

“Apache Subversion is entering an interesting phase in its development,” said Branko. “The changes in the latest release have laid the groundwork for a slew of important new features, and I’m grateful to WANdisco for giving me the opportunity to work full-time on the project as their Director of Subversion.”

Also joining WANdisco as a full-time Subversion developer is Stefan Fuhrmann. Stefan has been involved in the Apache Subversion project since 2010, and has worked on the TortoiseSVN project since 2003.

We also saw two IBM veterans – Paul Hewitt and Scott Rudenstein –join WANdisco’s sales management team. Paul Hewitt brings more than 25 years of software industry experience to his new position as WANdisco’s Sales Director for EMEA. Paul spent 10 of those 25 years at IBM Telelogic where he rose from the rank of Principal Account Manager to become UK Managing Director and Senior Vice President for Western Europe. After assuming this leadership position, Paul was able to grow Telelogic’s revenue by more than 50%.

Meanwhile, Scott Rudenstein brings over 20 years of industry experience to his new position as Director of Technical Sales and Services at WANdisco. Scott spent over 5 years as a Senior Sales Engineer in the IBM Rational Software Group specialising in software development tools. Scott was a member of the Rational Software team that was acquired by IBM for $2.1bn in February 2003. Scott has also held various Sales Director positions at US-based software companies such as Quest Software and Surgient.

We’d like to take this opportunity to welcome all our new starters to WANdisco! Want to join them? There’s still plenty of job opportunities at our Careers page.

This month, we set out to investigate which Apache Subversion client is most popular, with a poll that asked what clients – if any – the SVN community are using. The results are in and, according to respondents, there’s a clear winner in this popularity contest as over 60% of respondents said they were using TortoiseSVN.

TortoiseSVN is a free Windows client for Subversion – if you want to find out more about what TortoiseSVN has to offer, why not take a look at our ‘Top Ten Reasons To Try TortoiseSVN’ blog post? If you want to find out what all the fuss is about for yourself, we also have a handy starter guide: ‘How to Install TortoiseSVN and Make Your First Repository Change.’

After the success of 2011’s conference, Subversion Live is back for 2012! Subversion Live 2012 will take place in San Francisco (October 10th & 11th) Greenwich, Connecticut (October 16th & 17th) and London (October 23rd & 24th) and for a limited period registrants can get a 25% discount with our Early Bird offer.

This series of two-day conferences will feature a unique mix of expert-led best practices workshops, live Subversion demos and invaluable networking opportunities with experienced peers. Attendees will also have the opportunity to meet core Subversion committers, including Greg Stein, Stefan Fuhrmann, Julian Foad and Philip Martin.

Registration is now open – and don’t forget to enter the ‘earlybird’ code to claim your 25% discount.

After more training, but can’t wait until Subversion Live 2012? After getting plenty of requests from the community for more webinars on branching and merging, not only have we added another free training webinar on branching and merging but we’ve created some handy Subversion refcards.

Introduction to Merging in Apache Subversion’ starts with the basic question of ‘what is merging,’ before showing you how to perform the different types of merges, including reverse merges, and finally sharing some best practices to help you avoid merge hell, while ‘Introduction to Branching in Apache Subversion’ covers the essential know-how you need to get started with branching. This refcard covers:

  • What is a Branch?
  • How to Create a Branch
  • Identifying Branches
  • Deleting Branches

We’ll be adding more refcards over the coming weeks, so keep checking back for even more free training content.

Poll Results: Which Subversion Client Do You Use?

There’s no shortage of clients for Apache Subversion, each with its own combination of functionality, integration capabilities, and target platforms. But which client is the most popular with the SVN community? We recently ran a poll to find out and, after getting a great response, the results are in and there’s a clear winner…

Over 60% of respondents said they used TortoiseSVN, an SVN client for the Windows operating system.

It’s easy to see why TortoiseSVN is so popular with the community: not only does its context-sensitive menu integrate seamlessly with Windows shell, but it allows users to see the status of their files at a glance, thanks to its handy icon overlays. And, of course, just like Subversion it’s an established open source project with the option of professional support, for those who need some extra help with their implementation.

The poll also revealed the popularity of Subversion clients in general, with less than 5% of respondents saying they do not use a client.

Thank you to everyone who took part in our poll and if there’s a question you’d like to pose to the Subversion community, don’t hesitate to contact us with your ideas and we’ll try to feature them in future polls.

If you want to find out more about what TortoiseSVN has to offer, why not take a look at our ‘Top Ten Reasons To Try TortoiseSVN’ blog post? If you want to find out what all the fuss is about for yourself, we also have a handy starter guide: ‘How to Install TortoiseSVN and Make Your First Repository Change.’

Subversion Tip of the Week

Cleaning up your Working Copy

Before Apache Subversion begins modifying your working copy, it creates a “to do” list and locks the relevant part of the working copy while it performs an update. When Subversion has completed its modifications, it releases the lock and cleans up the “to do” list. However, if this process is interrupted (for example, the network connection is lost, or your computer crashes) then the “to do” list isn’t deleted. Before you can continue working on your project, you must run an ‘SVN Cleanup’ that instructs Subversion to complete any outstanding items on its “to do” list and finally, remove the lock on the working copy.

1) To run an ‘SVN Cleanup,’ select ‘Clean up…’ from the TortoiseSVN menu.

2) ‘Clean up working copy status’ is the basic option that will attempt to get your working copy into a workable and usable state. But, TortoiseSVN will present you with some additional options:

  • Revert all changes recursively – reverts all the local modifications that have not yet been committed to the repository. Tip: if you need to specify exactly which files to revert, you should use the ‘TortoiseSVN – Revert’ command.
  • Delete all unversioned files and folders – sends all files not under version control to the recycle bin.
  • Delete ignored files and folders – moves all ignored files/folders to the recycle bin.
  • Refresh shell overlays – one of the useful features of TortoiseSVN, is that it overlays repository files with status icons that tell you the current state of each file.

Sometimes these overlays won’t display the most up-to-date status. In this situation, ‘Refresh shell overlays’ should be used to force a refresh.

3) Once you have selected your options, select ‘Ok.’ You should now see a message informing you that your cleanup has been successful.

Our Support Engineers are the Sherpas of Source Control Management! Just as traditional Sherpas use their deep knowledge of local terrain to assist mountain climbers in reaching the highest peaks and avoiding pitfalls along the way, WANdisco’s Subversion Sherpas use their extensive experience to guide customers away from problems and enable them to get the most out of Subversion. Find out how our Sherpas can help you!

Subversion Tip of the Week

TortoiseSVN: The Right-Drag Menu

TortoiseSVN is designed to tightly integrate with Windows Explorer, but did you know that it also integrates with the right-drag menu? The crucial difference between Windows’ left-drag and right-drag, is that right-drag does not move the file immediately, but instead brings up a menu where you can select which operations to perform. When TortoiseSVN is installed, some new options will be added to this menu, which are particularly useful when you need to reorganize your working copy. As with other TortoiseSVN commands, the right-drag menu is context-sensitive, and it changes depending on the action you’re performing:

  • ‘SVN Copy and add files to this WC’ – This option will appear when you are right-dragging a file that is not under version control, into your working copy. Selecting it will automatically perform an ‘SVN Add’ to place the new file under version control.
  • ‘SVN Export versioned items here’ – This option will appear when you right-drag versioned files/folders from your working copy, to a location outside of your working copy.

Finally, when you right-drag versioned files/folders inside your working copy, to new locations inside the same working copy, you will be presented with four options:

  • SVN Move versioned item(s) here – this moves the file to the drop location. If the file already exists within the drop location, you will be asked to rename the file, or cancel the move. TortoiseSVN will automatically perform an ‘SVN Add’ on files and folders moved using this option.
  • SVN Move and rename versioned item here – again, the file is moved to the drop location, but this time TortoiseSVN will automatically prompt you to rename the file.
  • SVN Copy versioned item(s) here – this creates a copy at the drop location, while leaving the original file intact. An ‘SVN Add’ will automatically be performed on the copy.
  • SVN Copy and rename versioned item here – this creates a copy at the drop location, and prompts you to rename the new copy. The original file will remain at the old location, and the new, renamed copy will automatically be placed under version control.

Our Support Engineers are the Sherpas of Source Control Management! Just as traditional Sherpas use their deep knowledge of local terrain to assist mountain climbers in reaching the highest peaks and avoiding pitfalls along the way, WANdisco’s Subversion Sherpas use their extensive experience to guide customers away from problems and enable them to get the most out of Subversion. Find out how our Sherpas can help you!

Subversion Tip of the Week

Changelists: Bringing Order to your Commits

If you are working on several different issues simultaneously within your working copy, there is a risk of you losing track of which files are related to which change. In these situations, organizing your files into changelists can make them more manageable. Changelists can be created either from the ‘Check for modifications…’ dialog, or from the commit dialog. In this tutorial, we’ll look at creating a changelist from the commit dialog.

1) Start by running an ‘SVN Commit.’ This will bring up an unordered list of all the files you have modified since you last performed a commit.

2) Highlight the files you wish to make up your changelist, right-click and select ‘Move to changelist.’

3) In this example, we’ll create a new changelist. When prompted, enter the name of your changelist and click ‘Ok.’

4) TortoiseSVN will automatically sort all of your modified files into the new changelist. This allows you to see at-a-glance which modifications are related to which tasks, and to separately commit changes relating to different tasks.

Our Support Engineers are the Sherpas of Source Control Management! Just as traditional Sherpas use their deep knowledge of local terrain to assist mountain climbers in reaching the highest peaks and avoiding pitfalls along the way, WANdisco’s Subversion Sherpas use their extensive experience to guide customers away from problems and enable them to get the most out of Subversion. Find out how our Sherpas can help you!

Non-Coders Guide to Apache Subversion

Apache Subversion is one of the world’s most popular version control systems, and it’s easy to see why: it’s an established open source solution with a vibrant community of contributors and users, and professional support options for users who need some extra help with their Subversion installation. Now, thanks to easy-to-use client applications such as TortoiseSVN, and transparent tools such as uberSVN, even non-coders can reap the benefits of Apache Subversion. Subversion is an invaluable tool for bringing version control to projects with practically any contents – text documents, graphics, and more. In this tutorial, we’ll look at how to use Subversion to manage a project consisting of word documents – without writing a single line of code.

One of the easiest ways to get started with code-free Subversion, is to use uberSVN, the free, open ALM platform for Subversion, alongside the Windows TortoiseSVN client. Both of these products can be downloaded and used for free. This tutorial requires both to be installed. See our posts on installing uberSVN and TortoiseSVN, for walkthroughs of the installation process.

1) Once you have both uberSVN and TorotiseSVN installed, the first step is to create a repository. The easiest way to create a repository, is through uberSVN. Simply click on the ‘Repositories’ tab and select ‘Add.’

2) Enter a name for your repository and click ‘Next.’

3) Make sure the ‘create trunk, branches and tags directories’ option is ticked, and click ‘Done.’

4) On the next page, select who has read and write permissions for the repository, and specify whether you wish to use an Alternative Authz File. When you have finished, click ‘Save.’ You have now successfully created your repository.

5) Go into the ‘Repositories’ tab of uberSVN and take note of the repository’s URL. You will need this when checking out your working copy.

6) The next step is to checkout a working copy. Go to the file or folder where you wish to create your working copy, right-click and select ‘SVN Checkout.’

7) In the checkout dialog, enter the URL of the repository you just created, and click ‘Ok.’

8 ) You will see the following message, informing you of a successful checkout. Click ‘Ok.’

9) You will notice a new ‘Repository’ folder has been added to your hard drive.

10) Inside this new ‘Repository’ folder, you will find three more folders: ‘trunk’ ‘tags’ and ‘branches.’

11) Now you are ready to make some changes to your working copy. In this example, we will add some new text documents. Create your text documents as normal, or drag and drop existing files into your working copy. You will end up with something that looks like this:

12) You will need to add these files to Subversion before it places them under version control. This is made easy with TortoiseSVN: simply right-click on each file, select the ‘TortoiseSVN’ menu, and then click ‘Add’.

13) You will notice the ? symbols have now been replaced with + This means they have successfully been added to TortoiseSVN.

14) You will need to commit your changes before they appear in the repository. To perform a commit, simply right-click and select ‘SVN Commit’ from the Windows context menu.

15) At this point, it is good practice to enter a log message. When you have finished, click ‘Ok.’

16) If the commit is successful, you will see a confirmation message. Click ‘Ok.’ You have now successfully committed your changes to the repository.

17) If you explore your repository in the ‘Browse’ tab of uberSVN, you will see your new text files have been added.

18) Another essential feature of Subversion, is the ‘SVN Update’ command. This command should be run regularly, to ensure other team members’ commits are incorporated into your working copy. This reduces the chances of encountering merge conflicts when you’re committing back to the repository. To run ‘SVN Update,’ right-click on your working copy, and select the ‘SVN Update’ option.

19) You will see the following message, informing you that the commit has been successful.

20) Now, you can continue making changes to your working copy, and committing those changes back to the repository, while performing regular ‘SVN Update’s to reduce the chances of encountering a merge conflict – all with no coding required!

To get started with uberSVN, download it for free from http://www.ubersvn.com/download The latest version of the TortoiseSVN Windows client, can be downloaded from the WANdisco website.