Tag Archive for 'Subversion Live'

Happy Holidays from WANdisco!

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2012 has been an amazing year for WANdisco: a successful flotation, a patent approval, two acquisitions, a global series of WANdisco-organized Subversion conferences and upgrading our sponsorship of the Apache Software Foundation were just some of the highlights of the past twelve months.

We have plenty of exciting announcements planned for 2013, but for now we’d just like to thank everyone who has used our products, joined us for a webinar, eTraining or enterprise training session, picked us for your support needs, or provided us with the crucial feedback we need to make our products and services even better.

And, of course, we’d like to wish you a very happy holidays from the WANdisco Team!

Subversion Live 2012: Branching and Merging

Branching and merging is one of the issues Apache Subversion users seem to encounter the most issues with, and with that in mind we designed the Subversion Live 2012 programme to include plenty of best practices, tips and tricks on branching and merging.

Subversion Live 2012 attendees had the opportunity to attend two breakout sessions on branching and merging during the second day of the conference. The first breakout, ‘Branching and Merging Best Practices’ was conducted by WANdisco’s Director of Subversion Training, Mike Lester.

Mike’s session covered essential know-how for mastering branching and merging in Subversion, including factors that should be taken into account when planning your branching strategy, such as how to handle releases and bug fixes, and what changes require a branch. Mike advised that these decisions should be clearly laid out in a Policies and Procedures document.

He also shared some best practices for tracking branch usage, which included controlling where branches can be created and implementing a clear naming convention for your branches. On the merge tracking side of things, he explained how svn mergeinfo can be used to track merges.

Mike Lester’s session concluded with a Q and A session, where attendees had the opportunity to share their own branching and merging strategies, and get feedback from both Mike Lester and the other attendees.

After lunch, delegates had the opportunity to attend a ‘Merge and Performance Improvements’ session, led by Julian Foad. Julian is the lead developer for enhancements to Subversion’s merge capabilities at WANdisco, and his session delved into greater depth regarding the upcoming reintegrate merge overhaul in Subversion 1.8.

Julian explained that in Subversion 1.8, users will no longer have to specify that they are performing a reintegrate merge. This will make merging quicker, easier and less error-prone than in previous releases.

In Subversion 1.8, a branch will no longer become redundant after a reintegrate merge has been performed, so developers will be able to continue using the branch.

Julian also went into detail about how these merge changes will impact the SVN help command, essentially making the ‘svn help merge’ output more concise.

Read all about Subversion Live 2012, with our recaps of Day One and Day Two, and an in-depth look at the Subversion Live Keynote and the What’s Coming in SVN 1.8: Overview session. You can also check out Subversion Live 2012: Your Feedback to see what people are saying about the conference.

WANdisco’s October Roundup

This month was a busy one for WANdisco and the Subversion community, with new releases of Apache Subversion, SmartSVN and uberSVN and of course, WANdisco’s very own global Subversion conference series, Subversion Live.

Subversion Live 2012 took place in San Francisco; Greenwich Connecticut, and London, bringing attendees sessions covering everything from Subversion’s future, expert-led best practice workshops focused on getting the most out of Subversion and a unique ‘Roundtable with the Committers’ session. Attendees had the opportunity to meet and put their questions to the core Subversion committers, in addition to networking with their fellow Subversion users.

We’ve had fantastic feedback from the community; here’s just some of the comments we’ve received about Subversion Live 2012:

  • Thanks for running the conference. It was really helpful. The SVN folks I met were great. A lot more approachable than the typical geek gathering!
  • Thank you very much for the information you passed to me over the Subversion conference, I have now installed uberSVN on my laptop and have started to play with it. I have also signed up for a few webinars in November to kick off some internal training. I really enjoyed the conference, it was very well put together. You and your staff are a very friendly and helpful team which made the event a pleasure to attend.
  • I look forward to attending next year’s event, with a bit more experience under my belt I hope to have some challenging questions for your developers.

See what else attendees have been saying, at our Subversion Live 2012 feedback blog. You can also find out more about the different Subversion Live sessions by reading our recaps of Day One and Day Two, and an in-depth look at the Subversion Live Keynote, and the What’s Coming in 1.8: Overview session.

The Apache Subversion community released another update to the SVN 1.7 series this month, with the release of Apache Subversion 1.7.7. This featured even more fixes and enhancements, including:

  • A fix for a memory read bug
  • Unknown password stores in configuration files no longer cause errors
  • “All tests successful” is now printed at the end of ‘make check’
  • Fixes for issues that could occur when applying Git patch files
  • Status no longer descends into dir externals following upgrade

A full list of what’s new can be found in the Apache Subversion Changes file. As ever, the latest binaries are available to download from the WANdisco website.

Subversion 1.7.7 binaries are also available through uberSVN, the free-to-download, free-to-use, open ALM platform, which was also updated this month. uberSVN ‘Chimney House’ Release 7 is the final release in uberSVN’s ‘Chimney House’ series, and features a new license comparison tool, in addition to a list of fixes and enhancements. The license comparison tool ensures that users are fully aware of license changes, through a pop-up that displays the current license information and compares it to the incoming license prior to installation.

Other updates include:

  • A navigation warning that alerts the user if they attempt to navigate away from the LDAP locations page without saving.
  • The ability to perform other actions in the uberSVN UI whilst update packages are being downloaded (admins only.)
  • Apache Subversion 1.6.19 and 1.7.7 binaries shipped with all new downloads.
  • Removing LDAP locations now presents a warning and option to remove the associated users.

More information on all the changes included in uberSVN ‘Chimney House’ Release 7 is available at the Release Notes.

We were particularly excited to announce the first SmartSVN release since we acquired the popular graphical client last month. SmartSVN 7.0.7 brings some useful enhancements and fixes to the SmartSVN community, more information is available at the SmartSVN 7.0.7 blog post.

If you have any comments or suggestions for upcoming releases, you can post your ideas directly to the SmartSVN team at our dedicated SmartSVN Suggestions forum.

There’s been lots of exciting press activity this month, including articles in MoneyWeek and Investors Chronicle. WANdisco was also featured in Talk Business, which welcomed WANdisco CEO and co-founder David Richards as their latest technology columnist in residence this month. In his first article for the publication, ‘Our Man in the Valley,’ David dishes the dirt on life as a tech company in Silicon Valley. David Richards also shared his top three ways to reduce software development costs at the WANdisco blog, covering:

  • Continuous Integration/Continuous Delivery
  • Highly Available Source Code
  • Software Development without Geographic Constraints

If you’re looking to run leaner, meaner and drive IT costs down, be sure to read David’s  ‘Three Unconventional Ways to Manage IT Costs’ post.

Subversion Live 2012: Your Feedback

Thank you to everyone who participated in Subversion Live 2012, and who helped to make this global series of conferences for the Apache Subversion community such a resounding success.

We’ve received fantastic feedback so far, here’s just some of the comments we’ve received about Subversion Live 2012:

What You’ve Been Emailing

  • Thanks for running the conference. It was really helpful. The SVN folks I met were great. A lot more approachable than the typical geek gathering!
  • Thank you very much for the information you passed to me over the Subversion conference, I have now installed uberSVN on my laptop and have started to play with it. I have also signed up for a few webinars in November to kick off some internal training. I really enjoyed the conference, it was very well put together.  You and your staff are a very friendly and helpful team which made the event a pleasure to attend.
  • I look forward to attending next year’s event, with a bit more experience under my belt I hope to have some challenging questions for your developers.

What The Subversion Live Feedback Forms Have To Say……

  • Fantastic, even better than last year!
  • Good to meet more WANdisco staff
  • I would definitely attend next year’s event
  • My team hope to meet the WANdisco staff again

We also asked attendees what they find the most beneficial about Subversion Live, here’s some of the things that kept coming up:

  • Meeting the committers
  • Merge topics
  • Meeting WANdisco and other company employees
  • Apache Subversion 1.8 overview
  • The opportunity to speak to technical experts
  • The networking aspect
  • Breakout sessions
  • Finding out about new best practices
  • Chance to talk to SVN committers and the power users, and the WANdisco execs
  • Knowledge and advice on merging practices and tricks to speeding up transactions
  • Branching best practices
  • Hook scripts
  • Committer discussions
If you attended the event and have yet to provide feedback, you can either comment on this post, tweet us, or Contact Us directly. We’re already planning the next event, and your feedback is invaluable in helping us continue to make future Subversion Live events even better.

 

Subversion Live: What’s Coming in SVN 1.8?

Apache Subversion 1.8 is currently scheduled for release later this year, so it’s no surprise that Subversion Live London’s ‘What’s Coming in 1.8: Overview’ session drew a large crowd, especially as the session was conducted by core Subversion committers Julian Foad, Stefan Fuhrmann, Ben Reser and Philip Martin.

First, the committers covered what the community can expect from the 1.8 release process, and stressed the importance of community testing during the Release Candidate stage. “The Release Candidates are your opportunity to tell us about the bugs that really hurt you,” said Stefan.

The session then moved onto the new functionality that’s planned for this release, with an in-depth explanation of the following:

  • EV2 – a new framework for Subversion 1.8
  • Deltification improvements – the committers stressed that this will be particularly useful for people working on large repositories
  • A new benchmarking tool for identifying server and performance bottlenecks
  • Support for –include -externals in SVN Commit
  • SVN Merge improvements – users will no longer have to distinguish between a reintegrate merge and a sync merge
  • svn mergeinfo will include a summary diagram as the default output
  • revprop handling – improved handling during backup
  • A more interactive SVN Resolve command

  • Three new options for SVN Diff (–ignore-properties, –properties-only, and –patch-compatible)
  • A new password agent on UNIX
  • svnadmin freeze – this command will delay commits while other operations are performed on the repository. Throughout this process, the repository remains live. The committers revealed that this new feature was inspired by a conversation with an attendee at Subversion Live 2011.

Unsurprisingly, many attendees used the Q and A time at the end of the presentation to quiz the core committers on the finer details of the upcoming 1.8 release, especially the changes to inherited properties, pristine copies, reintegrate merges, and even Subversion’s bindings. The bindings question led to an invitation for the audience members to become Subversion committers themselves: “If the bindings are important to your business, send us a patch,” said Philip Martin.

Another topic of conversation during the Q and A section, was whether upgrading the working copy to 1.8 should be a manual or an automatic process. The general consensus among Subversion Live attendees seemed to be that it should be manual.

Attendees were also able to get advice from the committers on how to leverage Subversion 1.8’s features for their own individual use cases. In fact, there were so many questions that the next session was due to start before all the attendees’ questions were answered. Thankfully, all of the core committers were at Subversion Live throughout the last day (and were also available for more questioning during the Committer Roundtable session) giving attendees plenty of time to find out more about Subversion 1.8.

Read all about Subversion Live 2012, with our recaps of Day One and Day Two, and an in-depth look at the Subversion Live Keynote.

New Subversion Live Session: Beyond Scrum

Subversion Live 2012, the global conference series for the Subversion community,  is fast approaching, and today we’re excited to bring you news of a brand new Subversion Live session. Andy Singleton, Founder and CEO of Assembla will be presenting ‘Beyond Scrum: The Move to Scalable Agile with Continuous Delivery,’ joining our list of exciting speakers, which includes:

  • Greg Stein – Vice President of Subversion and former ASF Chairman
  • Hyrum Wright – Software Engineer at Google
  • Stefan Fuhrmann – TortoiseSVN contributor since 2003 and committer to the Subversion project since 2010
  • Julian Foad – lead developer for enhancements to Subversion’s merge capabilities at WANdisco
  • Philip Martin – part of the team that developed the first version of Subversion

Andy Singleton’s session will cover how the new and improved code merge system in the upcoming Subversion 1.8 release will facilitate the continuous delivery process for the first time, transforming the possibilities for scalable and agile development processes for the enterprise.

In addition to Andy’s cutting-edge SVN 1.8-focused session, Subversion Live will cover a wide range of topics:

  • Merge & Performance Improvements
  • Hook Scripts
  • Branching & Merging Best Practices
  • Best Practices for Large Subversion Deployments
  • ……and more!

Taking place in San Francisco (October 10th and 11th) Greenwich, CT (October 16th and 17th) and London (October 23rd and 24th) Subversion Live is a two day series of conferences especially for the Apache Subversion community. If you haven’t already registered, there’s still time to get your tickets, or learn more about this exciting event.

Merging in Subversion: Merge a Range of Revisions

Along with branching, merging is the issue that regularly causes Apache Subversion users the most confusion – but merging needn’t be complicated! In this post, we’ll show you how to successfully perform a merge in less than ten steps, using TortoiseSVN’s ‘merge a range of revisions’ option.

Tip. Two common scenarios where this type of merge comes in handy are sync’ing a development branch by applying all the latest changes from its ‘parent’ branch; and cherry-picking specific changes to add to your release branch.

To merge a range of revisions:

1) Right-click on the file you wish to merge and open the ‘TortoiseSVN’ menu.

2) Select ‘Merge’ from TortoiseSVN’s sub-menu.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3) Select the ‘Merge a Range of Revisions’ option.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4) In the ‘Merge’ dialog, select the desired URL using the “….” button.

5) Either specify the revision numbers you wish to merge, or leave the revision range blank to merge all outstanding changes from the specified source.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6) Once you have entered all the relevant information, click ‘Next.’

7) TortoiseSVN will open the ‘Merge options’ dialog. In most instances, the default settings can be used.

8) Select ‘Merge’ to perform your merge!

Need more info on branching and merging in Subversion? This year’s Subversion Live series of conferences features a session dedicated to Branching and Merging Best Practices. Visit http://www.wandisco.com/svn-live-2012 to find out more.

Branching in Apache Subversion Made Easy

Branching is a powerful and useful feature of Apache Subversion but, because it has a reputation for being difficult to master, many users never take advantage of it. In this post we’ll show you how to create a new branch, and then switch to this branch ready to begin working on its contents.

Creating a Branch in 5 Steps

1) To get started, right click on the folder you want to copy to a branch, and select the ‘Branch/Tag’ option from the TortoiseSVN menu.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2) In the ‘To path’ box, enter the location you want your branch to be copied to.

3) Enter a log message in the ‘Log message’ box.

4) Select which revision you wish to copy (this is typically HEAD revision, but you can specify another revision, if required.)

5) Click ‘OK.’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You have now created your branch!

 

 

 

 

 

3 Steps to Switch to Your New Branch

Now you’ve created a new branch, you’ll need to switch to it in order to begin working on its contents.

1) Right-click on the top level folder of your project and select ‘Switch’ from the TortoiseSVN context menu.

2) Enter the URL of the new branch you just created.

3) Ensure the ‘Head Revision’ button is selected, and click ‘Ok.’

 

 

 

 

 

 

The new branch will appear in your working copy!

Note, any changes that have not been committed to the repository will be merged when you run the switch command. Make sure you’ve either committed your changes before performing the switch, or revert your working copy to a revision that has already been committed to the repository.

Need more Subversion know-how? After getting a great response from the Apache Subversion community in 2011, Subversion Live is back for 2012, bringing the Subversion community sessions covering everything from Subversion’s future, to expert-led best practices workshops, as well as the unique opportunity to meet the core Subversion committers.

WANdisco To Attend San Francisco Jenkins User Conference

September and October are shaping up to be a busy few months for the open source community – not only are we gearing up for three Subversion Live conferences, but there’s just a few weeks to go until the Jenkins User Conference (JUC) in San Francisco.

After attending the JUC in New York, WANdisco are excited to be meeting the Jenkins community again in San Francisco. Be sure to look out for the WANdisco table, if you’re attending the San Francisco JUC. And if you haven’t got your ticket yet, you can use the  “JUC-2012SF” code when registering to claim a $100 discount!

Speaking of discount codes, listen to our recent podcast with Greg Stein, Vice President of Subversion at the ASF, for a special 30% discount code for Subversion Live. If you haven’t already heard, Subversion Live is a global series of conferences for the SVN community. This year’s conference series is bigger and better than ever, with events taking place in San Francisco (October 10th & 11th) Greenwich Connecticut (October 16th & 17th) and London (October 23rd & 24th).

Confirmed sessions include:

  • What’s coming in 1.8
  • Best Practices for Large SVN Deployments
  • Merge & Performance Improvements
  • Apache Bloodhound
  • Hook Scripts
  • ….and more!

Visit http://www.wandisco.com/svn-live-2012 for more info!

Subversion Live: Branching and Merging Best Practices

You may already have heard that Subversion Live is back for 2012, once again bringing the Apache Subversion community their own conference series. This year’s conference series is bigger and better than ever, with events taking place in San Francisco (October 10th & 11th) Greenwich Connecticut (October 16th & 17th) and London (October 23rd & 24th).

Confirmed sessions include:

  • What’s coming in 1.8
  • Best Practices for Large SVN Deployments
  • Merge & Performance Improvements
  • Apache Bloodhound
  • Hook Scripts
  • ….and more!

As part of Subversion Live 2012, WANdisco’s Director of Training Mike Lester will deliver a session on branching and merging best practices. We caught up with Mike, to find out what Subversion Live attendees can expect from ‘Branching & Merging Best Practices,’ and how 1.7’s merge tracking enhancements impacted Subversion users.

In your opinion, why does branching and merging remain such a hot topic for Subversion developers?

Mike Lester: People fear merging and thus avoid using branches, one of the most powerful tools built into Apache Subversion. They forget that as developers they have been doing branching and merging by hand for years, and fail to take advantage of all the capabilities that Subversion can bring to these activities.

Apache Subversion 1.7 introduced some merge tracking enhancements. How did these impact the branching and merging process for SVN users?

Mike Lester: By isolating the subtree mergeinfo updates to only the subtrees affected by a merge, rather than updating all subtree merge info, it makes keeping track of what was actually changed easier to monitor.

Who would benefit from attending ‘Branching and Merging Best Practices?

Mike Lester: Anyone that uses Subversion on multi-developer projects needs to come up with a plan on how they will use branches and merging. If you don’t have a plan yet or think your current procedures might be improved, this talk should help.

Can you give us a sneak preview of some of the best practices you’ll share in your Subversion Live session?

Mike Lester: Options on when to merge, guidelines of monitoring branches, examples of how project planning must change to do branching and merging and in a controlled manner.

Not signed up yet? Visit http://www.wandisco.com/svn-live-2012 to register, or find out more!