Tag Archive for 'OSS'

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Is Subversion Ready for the Enterprise?

At WANdisco, we firmly believe that Apache Subversion is a commercial quality version control system ready for the enterprise. With everything that Subversion has to offer enterprise users, it’s easy to see why it’s becoming such a popular choice:

  • It’s open source – cost is one of the most commonly-cited reasons for adopting open source solutions such as Subversion, but there are many other benefits. Most notably, open source projects tend to be collaborative efforts between many developers, so users reap the benefit of a team of developers, all with their own particular skills and areas of expertise.
  • It’s an established project – accepted into the Apache Incubator in 2009 and graduating a year later, today Subversion is an Apache Top Level Project maintained by a global community of contributors.
  • It’s the center of a vibrant ecosystem – Apache Subversion users have access to countless additional client tools, GUIs and plugins. Subversion also integrates with most of the major IDEs, including Eclipse and Microsoft Visual Studio.
  • Free community support – another benefit of utilizing open source technology is the transparent, archived communication that makes up an open source project’s mailing lists and forums, including Subversion’s dedicated SVNForum. This communication can be an invaluable source of information for users, and in many instances, a question will have already been asked – and answered – by someone else. If you can’t find the answer you were looking for, ask the community directly. There’s also no shortage of free training resources available online, including webinars, refcards and tutorials.
  • Professional support option – Subversion has an extensive community of users who are always willing to answer queries, but mailing lists and forums aren’t always the ideal place to reach out to when disaster strikes your enterprise deployment. As a long-established open source solution, there are professional support options available for Apache Subversion.

Our professional support services for Subversion includes:

  1. 24-by-7 worldwide coverage
  2. Guaranteed response times
  3. Indemnification coverage
  4. Subversion system health check
  5. 8 hours of free consulting or training

Enterprise training is another option for users who need additional support with their Subversion installation.

Despite all the benefits, there are some potential issues to consider when working with large Subversion deployments. If you’re using multiple SVN repositories across globally distributed teams, you may encounter the following challenges:

  • Loss of productivity when the central server fails and users at remote sites cannot access the latest version of your project.
  • Slow networks encourage developers at remote sites to checkout and/or commit infrequently. This increases the chances of encountering time-consuming conflicts.
  • Unnecessary read operations taking place over the WAN, as users at remote sites repeatedly perform read operations to access the same files. This degrades the performance of both the central Subversion server and the network.
  • Every remote request entails a WAN penalty. Although Subversion clients only send changes to the central server when modifications to existing source code files are committed, when a new file is committed or an existing file is checked out, the entire file is sent over the WAN.
  • When Subversion is implemented with an Apache Web Server as a front-end, and the WebDAV HTTP protocol is used, the WAN penalty can be significant. This is particularly true of commits that consist of a large number of files.

To help enterprises overcome these challenges, we’ve just announced an ongoing series of free webinars. Over the course of each hour-long ‘Scaling Subversion for the Enterprise’ session, our expert Solution Architect Patrick Burma will cover all the issues enterprises can encounter when using multiple Subversion repositories across globally distributed teams. He will also discuss the accompanying solutions from the administrative, business and IT perspectives, and will be available to answer specific questions.

You can register for all of this week’s sessions now:

Subversion Tip of the Week

Using SVN Move

Apache Subversion’s ‘svn move’ command allows the user to move files and directories and can be applied to both the working copy and the repository. The key difference between this command and ‘svn copy,’ is that ‘svn move’ also deletes the original file. This makes running ‘svn move’ equivalent to performing an ‘svn copy’ followed by ‘svn delete.’

…in the Working Copy

Running this command at the working copy level requires you to specify the file you’re moving and the location you’re moving it to:

svn move (working-copy-path)/item-being-moved (working-copy-path)/new-location

In this example we’re moving the ‘Release2’ item to the ‘Releases’ directory.

svn move

Note, you’ll need to perform a commit to send this change to the repository and share it with the rest of your team.

…in the Repository

It’s also possible to move items inside the repository. As this creates a new revision, you’ll need to supply a log message alongside the command:

svn move (repository-URL)/item-being-moved -m “log message” (repository-URL)/new-location

In this example we’re moving the item ‘Release’ to the ‘Releases’ directory.

svn move 2

Looking for an easy-to-use cross platform Subversion client? Claim your free 30 day trial of SmartSVN Professional by visiting: www.smartsvn.com/download

WANdisco’s February Roundup

This month, we launched a trio of innovative Hadoop products: the world’s first production-ready distro; a wizard-driven management dashboard; and the first and only 100% uptime solution for Apache Hadoop.

hadoop big data

We started this string of Big Data announcements with WANdisco Distro (WDD) a fully tested, free-to-download version of Apache Hadoop 2. WDD is based on the most recent Hadoop release, includes all the latest fixes and undergoes the same rigorous quality assurance process as our enterprise software solutions.

This release paved the way for our enterprise Hadoop solutions, and we announced the WANdisco Hadoop Console (WHC) shortly after. WHC is a plug-and-play solution that makes it easy for enterprises to deploy, monitor and manage their Hadoop implementations, without the need for expert HBase or HDFS knowledge.

The final product in this month’s Big Data announcements was WANdisco Non-Stop NameNode. Our patented technology makes WANdisco Non-Stop Namenode the first and only 100% uptime solution for Hadoop, and offers a string of benefits for enterprise users:

  • Automatic failover and recovery
  • Automatic continuous hot backup
  • Removes single point of failure
  • Eliminates downtime and data loss
  • Every NameNode server is active and supports simultaneous read and write requests
  • Full support for HBase

To support the needs of the Apache Hadoop community, we’ve also launched a dedicated Hadoop forum. At this forum, users can get advice on their Hadoop installation and connect with fellow users, including WANdisco’s core Apache Hadoop developers Dr. Konstantin V. Shvachko, Dr. Konstantin Boudnik, and Jagane Sundar.

subversion

For Apache Subversion users, we announced the next webinars in our free training series:

  • Subversion Administration – everything you need to administer a Subversion development environment
  • Introduction to SmartSVN – a short introduction to how Subversion works with the SmartSVN graphical client
  • Checkout Command – how to get the most out of the checkout command, and the meaning of the various error messages you may encounter
  • Commit Command – learn more about this command, including diff usage, working with unversioned files and changelists
  • Introduction to Git – everything a new user needs to get started with Git
  • Hook Scripts – how to use hook scripts to automate tasks such as email notifications, backups and access control
  • Advanced Hook Scripts – an advanced look at hook scripts, including using a config file with hook scripts and passing data to hook scripts

We’ve announced an ongoing series of free webinars, which demonstrate how you can overcome these challenges from an administrative, business and IT perspective, and get the most out of deploying Subversion in an enterprise environment. These ‘Scaling Subversion for the Enterprise’ webinars will be conducted by our expert Solution Architect three times a week (Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday) at 10.00am PST/1.00pm EST, and will cover:

  • The latest technology that can help you overcome the limitations and risks associated with globally distributed deployments
  • Answers to your business-specific questions
  • How to solve critical issues
  • The free resources and offers that can help solve your business challenges

Subversion Tip of the Week

SVN Blame

In certain situations, you may need more information about how a file changed in a particular Apache Subversion revision and crucially, who was responsible for that change. This is achieved by running the ‘svn blame’ command. This command prints each modified line of the specified file, alongside the revision number and the username of the person responsible for that change.

To run the ‘svn blame’ command, enter:

svn blame (repository-URL)/file

svn blame

However, sometimes the change may simply be an arbitrary whitespace or other formatting change. If you suspect this could be the case, the extensions switch (-x) can be used in conjunction with several other switches to filter out arbitrary changes:

  • –ignore-all-space (-w) – ignores all whitespace.
  • –ignore-space-change (-b) – ignores all changes in the amount of whitespace.
  • –ignore-eol-style – ignores changes in end-of-line-style.

In this example, we’re running ‘svn blame’ on the same file, but this time specifying that any EOL changes should be ignored.

svn blame -x –ignore-eol-style (repository-URL)/file

svn blame 2

Looking for an easy-to-use cross platform Subversion client? Claim your free 30 day trial of SmartSVN Professional by visiting: www.smartsvn.com/download

WANdisco Announces Free Online Hadoop Training Webinars

We’re excited to announce a series of free one-hour online Hadoop training webinars, starting with four sessions in March and April. Time will be allowed for audience Q&A at the end of each session.

Wednesday, March 13 at 10:00 AM Pacific, 1:00 PM Eastern

A Hadoop Overview” will cover Hadoop, from its history to its architecture as well as:

  • HDFS, MapReduce, and HBase
  • Public and private cloud deployment options
  • Highlights of common business use cases and more

March 27, 10:00 AM Pacific, 1:00 pm Eastern

Hadoop: A Deep Dive” covers Hadoop misconceptions (not all clusters include thousands of machines) and:

  • Real world Hadoop deployments
  • Review of major Hadoop ecosystem components including: Oozie, Flume, Nutch, Sqoop and others
  • In-depth look at HDFS and more

April 10, 10:00 AM Pacific, 1:00 pm Eastern

Hadoop: A MapReduce Tutorial” will cover MapReduce at a deep technical level and will highlight:

  • The history of MapReduce
  • Logical flow of MapReduce
  • Rules and types of MapReduce jobs
  • De-bugging and testing
  • How to write foolproof MapReduce jobs

April 24, 10:00 AM Pacific, 1:00 pm Eastern

Hadoop: HBase In-Depth” will provide a deep technical review of HBase and cover:

  • Its flexibility, scalability and components
  • Schema samples
  • Hardware requirements and more

Space is limited so click here to register right away!

Subversion Tip of the Week

SVN Import

There are two main options when you need to add new file(s) to your Apache Subversion project: the ‘SVN Add’ command and ‘SVN Import.’ The advantage of performing an ‘SVN Import’ is that:

  • ‘SVN Import’ communicates directly with the repository, so no working copy or checkout is required.
  • Your files are immediately committed to the repository, and are therefore available to the rest of the team.
  • Intermediate directories that don’t already exist in the repository are automatically created without the need for additional switches.

‘SVN Import’ is typically used when you have a local file tree that’s being added to your Subversion project. Run the following to add a file/file tree to your repository:

svn import -m “log message” (local file/file tree path) (repository-URL)

In this example, we’re adding the contents of the “Release2” folder to the repository, in an existing ‘branches’ directory.

svn import 1

As already mentioned, intermediate directories do not need to exist prior to running the ‘SVN Import’ command. In this example, we’re again importing the contents of ‘Release2,’ but this time we’re simultaneously creating a ‘Release2’ directory to contain the files.

svn import create new folder

If you check the repository, you’ll see a new ‘Release2’ directory has been created. The contents of your ‘Release2’ file tree are located inside.

ubersvn import

Want more advice on your Apache Subversion installation? We have a full series of SVN refcards for free download, covering hot topics such as branching and merging, and best practices. You can find out more at www.wandisco.com/svnref

Adding and Deleting Files from the Command Line

When working with files under Apache Subversion’s version control, eventually you will need to start adding and removing files from your project. This week’s tip explains how to add a file to a project at the working copy level or, alternatively, commit it straight to the central repository. It will also highlight how to delete a file, either by scheduling it for deletion via the working copy or deleting it straight from the central repository.

Adding Files

Files can be added to a project via the working copy. After you’ve added the file to your working copy, it’ll be sent to the central repository and shared with the rest of your team the next time you perform an ‘svn commit.’

To add a file to your working copy (and schedule it for addition the next time you perform a commit) run:

svn add (working-copy-location)/file-to-be-added

In this example we’re adding a file called ‘executable’ to the trunk directory of the ‘NewRepo’ working copy.

Subversion 1

You’ll need to perform a commit to send this item to the repository and share it with the rest of your team.

Subversion 2

Deleting Files 

Once you start adding files to your working copy, sooner or later you’ll need to remove files. When files are deleted in the working copy, they’re scheduled for deletion in the repository the next time you perform a commit, in exactly the same way as the ‘svn add’ command.

Schedule files for deletion in the working copy by running:

svn delete (working-copy-location)/file-to-be-deleted

In this example, we’re scheduling ‘executable.png’ for deletion.

Subversion 3

Alternatively, you can delete files from the repository immediately. Note, this operation creates a new revision and therefore requires a log message.

svn delete -m “log message” (repository-URL)/file-to-be-deleted

Subversion 4

Looking for an easy-to-use cross platform Subversion client? Claim your free 30 day trial of SmartSVN Professional by visiting: www.smartsvn.com/download

Fetching Previous Revisions in Subversion

One of the fundamental features of Apache Subversion is that it remembers every change committed to the central repository, allowing users to easily recover previous versions of their project.

There are several methods available to users who wish to roll back to an earlier revision:

1) Perform a Checkout

By default, Subversion checks out the head revision, but you can instruct it to checkout a previous revision by adding a revision number to your command:

svn checkout -r(revision-number) (repository-URL)

In this example, we’re creating a working copy from the repository data in revision 5.

checking out revision 5

2) ‘Update’ to Previous Revision

If you already have a working copy, you can ‘update’ it to a previous revision by using ‘svn update’ and specifying the revision number:

svn update -r(revision-number) (working-copy-location)

In this example, we’re updating the ‘Project’ working copy to revision 5.

svn update to past revision

3) Perform a Reverse Merge

Alternatively, you can perform a reverse merge on your working copy. Usually, a reverse merge is followed by an svn commit, which sends the previous revision to the repository. This effectively rolls the project back to an earlier version and is useful if recent commit(s) contain errors or features you need to remove.

To perform a reverse merge, run:

svn merge -r(revision-to-be-merged):(target-revision) (working-copy-URL)

svn reverse merge

Looking for an easy-to-use cross platform Subversion client? Claim your free 30 day trial of SmartSVN Professional by visiting: www.smartsvn.com/download

Subversion Tip of the Week

Getting Help With Your Subversion Working Copy

When it comes to getting some extra help with your Apache Subversion installation, you will find plenty of documentation online and even a dedicated forum where SVN users can post their questions and answer others. However, Subversion also comes with some handy built-in commands that can show you specific information about your working copy, files, directories, and all of Subversion’s subcommands and switches. This post explains how to access all of this information from the command line.

1) SVN Help

One of the most useful features of command line Subversion is the instant access to its built-in documentation through the ‘svn help’ command. To review all of the details about a particular subcommand, run:

svn help (subcommand)

In the example below, we’ve requested information on the ‘unlock’ subcommand. The printout includes all the additional switches that can be used in conjunction with ‘svn unlock.’

svn help unlock

Alternatively, if you need to see a list of all the available subcommands, simply run ‘svn help.’

svn help

2) SVN Info

If you need more information about the paths in a particular working copy, run the ‘svn info’ command. This will display:

  • Path
  • Repository URL
  • Repository Root
  • Repository UUID
  • Current revision number
  • Node Kind
  • Schedule
  • Information on the last change that occurred (author, revision number, date)

svn info

3) SVN Status

This command prints the status of your files and directories in your local working copy:

svn status (working-copy-path)

svn status

Want more advice on your Apache Subversion installation? We have a full series of SVN refcards for free download, covering hot topics such as branching and merging, and best practices. You can find out more at www.wandisco.com/svnref

 

WANdisco Joins Fusion-io Technology Alliance Program

WANdisco is excited to announce its partnership with Fusion-io. Following the launch of our first Big Data offering, the world’s first production-ready Apache Hadoop 2 distro, we’ve joined Fusion-io’s Technology Alliance Program. This program focuses on working with leaders in strategic market segments to deliver proven solutions, access to resources and expertise to enhance the value of technology offerings.

“With rapid growth in big data demands around the world, customers require proven solutions and expertise that deliver Hadoop availability with no downtime or data loss,” said Tyler Smith, Fusion-io’s Vice President of Alliances. “WANdisco is a valuable addition to our Technology Alliance Program as we work together to fulfill the market demand for innovative and proven big data solutions.”

As mentioned, this partnership news follows the launch of WANdisco Distro (WDD), a fully tested, production-ready version of Apache Hadoop, based on the most recent Hadoop release. WDD lays the foundation for WANdisco’s upcoming enterprise Hadoop solutions, including the WANdisco Hadoop Console, a comprehensive, wizard-driven management dashboard and the Non-Stop NameNode, which combines our patented replication technology with open source Hadoop to deliver optimum performance, scalability and availability on a 24-by-7 basis.

You can find out more about the Technology Alliance announcement by reading the press release, or visiting Fusion-io’s Technology Alliance Program webpage.