Tag Archive for 'merging'

WANdisco’s February Roundup

This month, we launched a trio of innovative Hadoop products: the world’s first production-ready distro; a wizard-driven management dashboard; and the first and only 100% uptime solution for Apache Hadoop.

hadoop big data

We started this string of Big Data announcements with WANdisco Distro (WDD) a fully tested, free-to-download version of Apache Hadoop 2. WDD is based on the most recent Hadoop release, includes all the latest fixes and undergoes the same rigorous quality assurance process as our enterprise software solutions.

This release paved the way for our enterprise Hadoop solutions, and we announced the WANdisco Hadoop Console (WHC) shortly after. WHC is a plug-and-play solution that makes it easy for enterprises to deploy, monitor and manage their Hadoop implementations, without the need for expert HBase or HDFS knowledge.

The final product in this month’s Big Data announcements was WANdisco Non-Stop NameNode. Our patented technology makes WANdisco Non-Stop Namenode the first and only 100% uptime solution for Hadoop, and offers a string of benefits for enterprise users:

  • Automatic failover and recovery
  • Automatic continuous hot backup
  • Removes single point of failure
  • Eliminates downtime and data loss
  • Every NameNode server is active and supports simultaneous read and write requests
  • Full support for HBase

To support the needs of the Apache Hadoop community, we’ve also launched a dedicated Hadoop forum. At this forum, users can get advice on their Hadoop installation and connect with fellow users, including WANdisco’s core Apache Hadoop developers Dr. Konstantin V. Shvachko, Dr. Konstantin Boudnik, and Jagane Sundar.

subversion

For Apache Subversion users, we announced the next webinars in our free training series:

  • Subversion Administration – everything you need to administer a Subversion development environment
  • Introduction to SmartSVN – a short introduction to how Subversion works with the SmartSVN graphical client
  • Checkout Command – how to get the most out of the checkout command, and the meaning of the various error messages you may encounter
  • Commit Command – learn more about this command, including diff usage, working with unversioned files and changelists
  • Introduction to Git – everything a new user needs to get started with Git
  • Hook Scripts – how to use hook scripts to automate tasks such as email notifications, backups and access control
  • Advanced Hook Scripts – an advanced look at hook scripts, including using a config file with hook scripts and passing data to hook scripts

We’ve announced an ongoing series of free webinars, which demonstrate how you can overcome these challenges from an administrative, business and IT perspective, and get the most out of deploying Subversion in an enterprise environment. These ‘Scaling Subversion for the Enterprise’ webinars will be conducted by our expert Solution Architect three times a week (Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday) at 10.00am PST/1.00pm EST, and will cover:

  • The latest technology that can help you overcome the limitations and risks associated with globally distributed deployments
  • Answers to your business-specific questions
  • How to solve critical issues
  • The free resources and offers that can help solve your business challenges

Subversion Live 2012: Branching and Merging

Branching and merging is one of the issues Apache Subversion users seem to encounter the most issues with, and with that in mind we designed the Subversion Live 2012 programme to include plenty of best practices, tips and tricks on branching and merging.

Subversion Live 2012 attendees had the opportunity to attend two breakout sessions on branching and merging during the second day of the conference. The first breakout, ‘Branching and Merging Best Practices’ was conducted by WANdisco’s Director of Subversion Training, Mike Lester.

Mike’s session covered essential know-how for mastering branching and merging in Subversion, including factors that should be taken into account when planning your branching strategy, such as how to handle releases and bug fixes, and what changes require a branch. Mike advised that these decisions should be clearly laid out in a Policies and Procedures document.

He also shared some best practices for tracking branch usage, which included controlling where branches can be created and implementing a clear naming convention for your branches. On the merge tracking side of things, he explained how svn mergeinfo can be used to track merges.

Mike Lester’s session concluded with a Q and A session, where attendees had the opportunity to share their own branching and merging strategies, and get feedback from both Mike Lester and the other attendees.

After lunch, delegates had the opportunity to attend a ‘Merge and Performance Improvements’ session, led by Julian Foad. Julian is the lead developer for enhancements to Subversion’s merge capabilities at WANdisco, and his session delved into greater depth regarding the upcoming reintegrate merge overhaul in Subversion 1.8.

Julian explained that in Subversion 1.8, users will no longer have to specify that they are performing a reintegrate merge. This will make merging quicker, easier and less error-prone than in previous releases.

In Subversion 1.8, a branch will no longer become redundant after a reintegrate merge has been performed, so developers will be able to continue using the branch.

Julian also went into detail about how these merge changes will impact the SVN help command, essentially making the ‘svn help merge’ output more concise.

Read all about Subversion Live 2012, with our recaps of Day One and Day Two, and an in-depth look at the Subversion Live Keynote and the What’s Coming in SVN 1.8: Overview session. You can also check out Subversion Live 2012: Your Feedback to see what people are saying about the conference.

Merging in Subversion: Merge a Range of Revisions

Along with branching, merging is the issue that regularly causes Apache Subversion users the most confusion – but merging needn’t be complicated! In this post, we’ll show you how to successfully perform a merge in less than ten steps, using TortoiseSVN’s ‘merge a range of revisions’ option.

Tip. Two common scenarios where this type of merge comes in handy are sync’ing a development branch by applying all the latest changes from its ‘parent’ branch; and cherry-picking specific changes to add to your release branch.

To merge a range of revisions:

1) Right-click on the file you wish to merge and open the ‘TortoiseSVN’ menu.

2) Select ‘Merge’ from TortoiseSVN’s sub-menu.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3) Select the ‘Merge a Range of Revisions’ option.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4) In the ‘Merge’ dialog, select the desired URL using the “….” button.

5) Either specify the revision numbers you wish to merge, or leave the revision range blank to merge all outstanding changes from the specified source.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6) Once you have entered all the relevant information, click ‘Next.’

7) TortoiseSVN will open the ‘Merge options’ dialog. In most instances, the default settings can be used.

8) Select ‘Merge’ to perform your merge!

Need more info on branching and merging in Subversion? This year’s Subversion Live series of conferences features a session dedicated to Branching and Merging Best Practices. Visit http://www.wandisco.com/svn-live-2012 to find out more.

Getting Started with Apache Subversion

As the world’s most popular version control system, Apache Subversion has plenty to offer newcomers:

1. It’s an established project – accepted into the Apache Incubator in 2009 and graduating a year later, today Subversion is an Apache Top Level Project maintained by a global community of contributors.

2. Rich ecosystem – Apache Subversion users have access to countless free client tools, GUIs and plugins developed by the community. SVN also integrates with most of the major IDEs, including Eclipse and Microsoft Visual Studio.

3. Free Community Support – Have a question about Subversion? There’s no shortage of mailing lists and forums (including SVNForum.) In many cases, your question will have already been asked (and answered) by someone else. If you can’t find the answer, you can always post it yourself and the community will be happy to help you out.

4. Professional Support – Subversion has a great community of users who are always willing to answer queries, but mailing lists and forums aren’t always the ideal place to reach out to when disaster strikes your enterprise deployment. At WANdisco, we offer professional support services for Subversion, that includes 24-by-7 worldwide coverage, guaranteed response times, and indemnification coverage, for those who need that added security.

5. Powerful branching and merging functionality – Branching and merging can be a pain-point for Apache Subversion users but, used correctly, branching and merging can be Subversion’s greatest strength. We have some free branching and merging refcards, to help you master these potentially tricky issues.

Apache Subversion has plenty to offer users, but if you’re new to SVN – or even version control in general! – it can be difficult to know where to start. To help newcomers get off to a flying start with Subversion, we’ve just released a ‘Getting Started with Subversion’ refcard. This refcard covers all the essential information you need to get going with Subversion, including what Subversion actually is, the basic work cycle you can expect to encounter, and an installation guide. It then demonstrates how to create your first repository and covers the essential commands – svn checkout and svn commit.

Getting Started with Subversion’ is free to download. We’ll be adding more refcards in the coming weeks, so keep checking back for all the latest Free Training Content.

Subversion Live: Branching and Merging Best Practices

You may already have heard that Subversion Live is back for 2012, once again bringing the Apache Subversion community their own conference series. This year’s conference series is bigger and better than ever, with events taking place in San Francisco (October 10th & 11th) Greenwich Connecticut (October 16th & 17th) and London (October 23rd & 24th).

Confirmed sessions include:

  • What’s coming in 1.8
  • Best Practices for Large SVN Deployments
  • Merge & Performance Improvements
  • Apache Bloodhound
  • Hook Scripts
  • ….and more!

As part of Subversion Live 2012, WANdisco’s Director of Training Mike Lester will deliver a session on branching and merging best practices. We caught up with Mike, to find out what Subversion Live attendees can expect from ‘Branching & Merging Best Practices,’ and how 1.7’s merge tracking enhancements impacted Subversion users.

In your opinion, why does branching and merging remain such a hot topic for Subversion developers?

Mike Lester: People fear merging and thus avoid using branches, one of the most powerful tools built into Apache Subversion. They forget that as developers they have been doing branching and merging by hand for years, and fail to take advantage of all the capabilities that Subversion can bring to these activities.

Apache Subversion 1.7 introduced some merge tracking enhancements. How did these impact the branching and merging process for SVN users?

Mike Lester: By isolating the subtree mergeinfo updates to only the subtrees affected by a merge, rather than updating all subtree merge info, it makes keeping track of what was actually changed easier to monitor.

Who would benefit from attending ‘Branching and Merging Best Practices?

Mike Lester: Anyone that uses Subversion on multi-developer projects needs to come up with a plan on how they will use branches and merging. If you don’t have a plan yet or think your current procedures might be improved, this talk should help.

Can you give us a sneak preview of some of the best practices you’ll share in your Subversion Live session?

Mike Lester: Options on when to merge, guidelines of monitoring branches, examples of how project planning must change to do branching and merging and in a controlled manner.

Not signed up yet? Visit http://www.wandisco.com/svn-live-2012 to register, or find out more!

New Refcards: All About Subversion Checkouts and Commits

Need an intro to some essential Apache Subversion commands? We got such great feedback from last month’s branching and merging refcards, that we’ve already put together two more free refcards for the Subversion community.

All About the Apache Subversion Commit Command’ covers everything from the basic “what is a commit?” to more advanced information on editing log messages, ignoring files and directories, and an intro to hook scripts.

Meanwhile, ‘All About Checkouts’ provides a quick reference to making full use of the checkout command and understanding the messages generated under different scenarios. This refcard covers:

  • What is a checkout?
  • Performing a checkout from the command line
  • Performing a checkout with TortoiseSVN
  • How to create a nested folder
  • Changing the checkout file data

We’ve got even more refcards lined up for the coming weeks, so be sure to keep checking back for all the latest free training content. And if you’ve got an idea for a Subversion refcard, please don’t hesitate to Contact Us.

Need more Subversion know-how? After getting a great response from the Apache Subversion community in 2011, Subversion Live is back for 2012, bringing the Subversion community sessions covering everything from Subversion’s future, to expert-led best practices workshops, as well as the unique opportunity to meet the core Subversion committers.

WANdisco’s July Roundup

As an active member of the ASF and Apache Subversion communities, this month we were excited to announce that our sponsorship of the Apache Software Foundation will continue for a second year in a row. As an ASF sponsor WANdisco joins companies such as Google, Facebook, Yahoo!, HP and IBM.

The ASF Sponsorship Program is the official avenue for substantial, non-directed monetary contributions to the ASF, and funds raised through this program help the Foundation maintain leadership in the developer and open source communities.

Not content with continuing and upgrading our sponsorship, we increased the number of full-time Subversion committers by hiring two of the most experienced Subversion engineers in Branko Čibej and Stefan Fuhrmann. Branko Čibej joined the Subversion project in May 2000 and has been an active member of the community since then. He will take up the role of Director of Subversion at WANdisco.

“Apache Subversion is entering an interesting phase in its development,” said Branko. “The changes in the latest release have laid the groundwork for a slew of important new features, and I’m grateful to WANdisco for giving me the opportunity to work full-time on the project as their Director of Subversion.”

Also joining WANdisco as a full-time Subversion developer is Stefan Fuhrmann. Stefan has been involved in the Apache Subversion project since 2010, and has worked on the TortoiseSVN project since 2003.

We also saw two IBM veterans – Paul Hewitt and Scott Rudenstein –join WANdisco’s sales management team. Paul Hewitt brings more than 25 years of software industry experience to his new position as WANdisco’s Sales Director for EMEA. Paul spent 10 of those 25 years at IBM Telelogic where he rose from the rank of Principal Account Manager to become UK Managing Director and Senior Vice President for Western Europe. After assuming this leadership position, Paul was able to grow Telelogic’s revenue by more than 50%.

Meanwhile, Scott Rudenstein brings over 20 years of industry experience to his new position as Director of Technical Sales and Services at WANdisco. Scott spent over 5 years as a Senior Sales Engineer in the IBM Rational Software Group specialising in software development tools. Scott was a member of the Rational Software team that was acquired by IBM for $2.1bn in February 2003. Scott has also held various Sales Director positions at US-based software companies such as Quest Software and Surgient.

We’d like to take this opportunity to welcome all our new starters to WANdisco! Want to join them? There’s still plenty of job opportunities at our Careers page.

This month, we set out to investigate which Apache Subversion client is most popular, with a poll that asked what clients – if any – the SVN community are using. The results are in and, according to respondents, there’s a clear winner in this popularity contest as over 60% of respondents said they were using TortoiseSVN.

TortoiseSVN is a free Windows client for Subversion – if you want to find out more about what TortoiseSVN has to offer, why not take a look at our ‘Top Ten Reasons To Try TortoiseSVN’ blog post? If you want to find out what all the fuss is about for yourself, we also have a handy starter guide: ‘How to Install TortoiseSVN and Make Your First Repository Change.’

After the success of 2011’s conference, Subversion Live is back for 2012! Subversion Live 2012 will take place in San Francisco (October 10th & 11th) Greenwich, Connecticut (October 16th & 17th) and London (October 23rd & 24th) and for a limited period registrants can get a 25% discount with our Early Bird offer.

This series of two-day conferences will feature a unique mix of expert-led best practices workshops, live Subversion demos and invaluable networking opportunities with experienced peers. Attendees will also have the opportunity to meet core Subversion committers, including Greg Stein, Stefan Fuhrmann, Julian Foad and Philip Martin.

Registration is now open – and don’t forget to enter the ‘earlybird’ code to claim your 25% discount.

After more training, but can’t wait until Subversion Live 2012? After getting plenty of requests from the community for more webinars on branching and merging, not only have we added another free training webinar on branching and merging but we’ve created some handy Subversion refcards.

Introduction to Merging in Apache Subversion’ starts with the basic question of ‘what is merging,’ before showing you how to perform the different types of merges, including reverse merges, and finally sharing some best practices to help you avoid merge hell, while ‘Introduction to Branching in Apache Subversion’ covers the essential know-how you need to get started with branching. This refcard covers:

  • What is a Branch?
  • How to Create a Branch
  • Identifying Branches
  • Deleting Branches

We’ll be adding more refcards over the coming weeks, so keep checking back for even more free training content.

WANdisco Releases Subversion ‘Branching and Merging’ Refcards

Branching and merging can be a pain-point for Apache Subversion users but when used correctly, they become an invaluable tool for getting the most out of version control. Not sure where to start with your branching and merging strategy? Our brand new refcards have all the info you need to get to grips with branching and merging.

‘Introduction to Merging in Apache Subversion’

Merging doesn’t need to be frightening! ‘Introduction to Merging in Apache Subversion’ starts with the basic question of ‘what is merging,’ before showing you how to perform the different types of merges, including reverse merges, and finally sharing some best practices to help you avoid merge hell.

This refcard covers:

  • What is ‘Merging’?
  • How to Merge in Subversion:
  • – Merge a Range of Revisions
    – Reintegrate a Branch
    – Merge Two Different Trees

  • Reverse Merge
  • Merging Feature Branches
  • Merging Best Practices

‘Introduction to Branching in Apache Subversion’

Introduction to Branching in Apache Subversion’ covers the essential know-how you need to get started with branching in Subversion, including:

  • What is a Branch?
  • How to Create a Branch
  • Identifying Branches
  • Deleting Branches

We’ll be adding more refcards over the coming weeks, so keep checking back for even more free training content. We also run frequent free webinars for the Apache Subversion community, more info is available at the Free Training Webinars page.

WANdisco Announces Free Webinars for SVN Community

We hope you’re enjoying our bi-weekly free Subversion webinars! Thank you to everyone who has attended and sent us feedback on what they enjoyed, and what they’d like to see more of. Based on your feedback, we’ve devised another set of free training webinars for the Subversion community.

Here’s what’s coming up over the next couple of months (don’t forget, it’s free to register for any of our Apache Subversion webinars):

1) Hidden Subversion – get ahead of the game, as we share some tricks and techniques that many Subversion users aren’t even aware of.

2) Locking – we cover the Subversion Lock command in detail, including:

  • What is a lock?
  • How do you lock and unlock files?
  • Best practices for avoiding lock conflicts

3) Using Repository Browsers – drill down into the functionality of the Repo Browser, in this one-hour course.

4) Subversion Difference Command – get an overview of the various ways Subversion can compare files and generate meaningful reports.

5) Hook Scripts – these server-side executables can be used for a variety of tasks, including:

  • Automatic email notifications
  • Checkin content validation
  • Automatic backup
  • Specific access control

6) Introduction to uberSVN – an introductory webinar for uberSVN, the open ALM platform for Apache Subversion that’s easy to install, easy to use and easy to extend. This webinar will cover uberSVN’s core capabilities, including:

  • Installation and setup
  • Simplified repository creation and management
  • Team and user administration
  • Social coding capabilities
  • Extendibility with your favorite ALM tools

7) Access Control option with Subversion – need to control access to Apache Subversion repo information, but not sure which option is right for you? This session will weigh up the pros and cons of:

  • Subversion Access Control
  • Hook Scripts
  • uberSVN
  • …and more!

8 ) Branching and Merging – get an intro to the basic concepts of branching and merging, including when to perform a merge and create a branch, the different merge types, and some all-important best practices.

9) Subversion Properties – everything you need to know about SVN Properties! This one hour course will cover:

  • Defining properties
  • Property and “Standards and Procedures”
  • Property name rules
  • Automatic Properties
  • Recursively defining properties
  • ….and more!

Places are limited, so register now to avoid disappointment! And don’t forget to Contact Us if you have any comments, questions or suggestions for future webinars!

Introduction to Apache Subversion

What is Apache Subversion?

Subversion is an Apache-licensed, open source software versioning and version control system that can track changes to files, folders and directories. It can also be used to recover previous versions of data, and examine the history of how a particular dataset has changed. Subversion can operate across networks, encouraging collaboration by allowing team members at various locations to work on the same set of data. Subversion can be used to manage any collection of files – web pages, binaries, documentation – not just source code!

Downloading and Installing Apache Subversion

Certified open source Apache Subversion binaries are available to download from http://www.wandisco.com/subversion/download

To install, open the file to launch the setup wizard and follow the onscreen instructions to define which components you wish to install, and the install location. Enter the name of your server, the host port, and define the repository and repository location prefix – and hit install.

Alternatively, uberSVN makes Subversion easy and intuitive to use, and is free to download and free to use.

Creating your first repository

Once Subversion is installed, the first thing you need to do is create a repository. To create your first repository, open the command line, change the current directory to where you want to create your repository, and run the ‘svnadmin’ command:

svnadmin create {directory name}

Checking out a Project

To start working on your project, you must check out a working copy of the repository. This is achieved with the ‘checkout’ command:

svn checkout file {file location}

Commit Your Changes

Once you’ve made some changes to your working copy, you’ll want to push your changes to the server. Perform an “svn update” and an “svn diff” to test your changes, and resolve any warnings raised by Subversion, before committing. Once you’ve finished checking your modifications, and are ready to store the new revision in the repository, run the ‘commit’ command:

svn commit {path}

Get other people’s changes

When someone else performs a commit to the repository, you’ll need to pull those changes into your working copy, to ensure the latest trunk changes are compatible with what you’re doing in your working copy. Changes can be pulled into your working copy with the update command:

svn update {file name}
or
svn update {directory name}

Adding Files to a Project

Now you know how to checkout a working copy and commit changes back to the repository – but as you continue to develop your working copy, you may wish to add some new files to your project. When adding new files to Subversion, you need to tell the Subversion server about the files with the following command:

svn add {file name}
or
svn add {directory name}

Note that the new files won’t appear in the repository until you perform an ‘svn commit’ and send them to the repository.

Deleting Files from a Project

If at some point you want to remove these files from Subversion, run the delete command:

svn delete {file name}
or
svn delete {directory name}

Again, you must perform a commit before the file is deleted from the repository. You can also run ‘svn list’ to confirm that the file was successfully deleted from the repository.

And if you get stuck…..

The ‘svn –help’ function provides a summary of available commands or, for more information on a particular command, use:

svn help {command}

Other useful commands

  • svn status {path} – prints the status of working copy files and directories.
  • svn diff – display the differences between two revisions.
  • svn merge – applies the differences between two sources to a working copy path.
  • svn move SRC DST – think of this as ‘svn copy’ that automatically deletes the source file. This command moves a file or directory in your working copy, or in the repository. Note that Subversion does not support cross-repository moving, so it is impossible to move files across repositories with this command.
  • svn list – allows you to view the content of the Subversion repository, without having to download a working copy.
  • svn log – Subversion remembers every change made to your files and directories. This command displays the commit log messages. By default, it will show the information for the current working directory of your working copy. Alternatively, different paths can be specified.

Need more info?

On June 14th, 2012 we will be hosting a free ‘Introduction to Subversion’ webinar. This course is intended as a primer for new users or people who are thinking of making the jump to Subversion, and will cover the following topics:

  • Repository basics – creating and organizing
  • Checkouts, working folders, editing files and checkins
  • Reporting on changes
  • Simple branching
  • Simple merging

This webinar is free to attend, but places are limited so register now to avoid disappointment.