Tag Archive for 'feedback'

WANdisco’s October Roundup

This month was a busy one for WANdisco and the Subversion community, with new releases of Apache Subversion, SmartSVN and uberSVN and of course, WANdisco’s very own global Subversion conference series, Subversion Live.

Subversion Live 2012 took place in San Francisco; Greenwich Connecticut, and London, bringing attendees sessions covering everything from Subversion’s future, expert-led best practice workshops focused on getting the most out of Subversion and a unique ‘Roundtable with the Committers’ session. Attendees had the opportunity to meet and put their questions to the core Subversion committers, in addition to networking with their fellow Subversion users.

We’ve had fantastic feedback from the community; here’s just some of the comments we’ve received about Subversion Live 2012:

  • Thanks for running the conference. It was really helpful. The SVN folks I met were great. A lot more approachable than the typical geek gathering!
  • Thank you very much for the information you passed to me over the Subversion conference, I have now installed uberSVN on my laptop and have started to play with it. I have also signed up for a few webinars in November to kick off some internal training. I really enjoyed the conference, it was very well put together. You and your staff are a very friendly and helpful team which made the event a pleasure to attend.
  • I look forward to attending next year’s event, with a bit more experience under my belt I hope to have some challenging questions for your developers.

See what else attendees have been saying, at our Subversion Live 2012 feedback blog. You can also find out more about the different Subversion Live sessions by reading our recaps of Day One and Day Two, and an in-depth look at the Subversion Live Keynote, and the What’s Coming in 1.8: Overview session.

The Apache Subversion community released another update to the SVN 1.7 series this month, with the release of Apache Subversion 1.7.7. This featured even more fixes and enhancements, including:

  • A fix for a memory read bug
  • Unknown password stores in configuration files no longer cause errors
  • “All tests successful” is now printed at the end of ‘make check’
  • Fixes for issues that could occur when applying Git patch files
  • Status no longer descends into dir externals following upgrade

A full list of what’s new can be found in the Apache Subversion Changes file. As ever, the latest binaries are available to download from the WANdisco website.

Subversion 1.7.7 binaries are also available through uberSVN, the free-to-download, free-to-use, open ALM platform, which was also updated this month. uberSVN ‘Chimney House’ Release 7 is the final release in uberSVN’s ‘Chimney House’ series, and features a new license comparison tool, in addition to a list of fixes and enhancements. The license comparison tool ensures that users are fully aware of license changes, through a pop-up that displays the current license information and compares it to the incoming license prior to installation.

Other updates include:

  • A navigation warning that alerts the user if they attempt to navigate away from the LDAP locations page without saving.
  • The ability to perform other actions in the uberSVN UI whilst update packages are being downloaded (admins only.)
  • Apache Subversion 1.6.19 and 1.7.7 binaries shipped with all new downloads.
  • Removing LDAP locations now presents a warning and option to remove the associated users.

More information on all the changes included in uberSVN ‘Chimney House’ Release 7 is available at the Release Notes.

We were particularly excited to announce the first SmartSVN release since we acquired the popular graphical client last month. SmartSVN 7.0.7 brings some useful enhancements and fixes to the SmartSVN community, more information is available at the SmartSVN 7.0.7 blog post.

If you have any comments or suggestions for upcoming releases, you can post your ideas directly to the SmartSVN team at our dedicated SmartSVN Suggestions forum.

There’s been lots of exciting press activity this month, including articles in MoneyWeek and Investors Chronicle. WANdisco was also featured in Talk Business, which welcomed WANdisco CEO and co-founder David Richards as their latest technology columnist in residence this month. In his first article for the publication, ‘Our Man in the Valley,’ David dishes the dirt on life as a tech company in Silicon Valley. David Richards also shared his top three ways to reduce software development costs at the WANdisco blog, covering:

  • Continuous Integration/Continuous Delivery
  • Highly Available Source Code
  • Software Development without Geographic Constraints

If you’re looking to run leaner, meaner and drive IT costs down, be sure to read David’s  ‘Three Unconventional Ways to Manage IT Costs’ post.

Subversion Live 2012: Your Feedback

Thank you to everyone who participated in Subversion Live 2012, and who helped to make this global series of conferences for the Apache Subversion community such a resounding success.

We’ve received fantastic feedback so far, here’s just some of the comments we’ve received about Subversion Live 2012:

What You’ve Been Emailing

  • Thanks for running the conference. It was really helpful. The SVN folks I met were great. A lot more approachable than the typical geek gathering!
  • Thank you very much for the information you passed to me over the Subversion conference, I have now installed uberSVN on my laptop and have started to play with it. I have also signed up for a few webinars in November to kick off some internal training. I really enjoyed the conference, it was very well put together.  You and your staff are a very friendly and helpful team which made the event a pleasure to attend.
  • I look forward to attending next year’s event, with a bit more experience under my belt I hope to have some challenging questions for your developers.

What The Subversion Live Feedback Forms Have To Say……

  • Fantastic, even better than last year!
  • Good to meet more WANdisco staff
  • I would definitely attend next year’s event
  • My team hope to meet the WANdisco staff again

We also asked attendees what they find the most beneficial about Subversion Live, here’s some of the things that kept coming up:

  • Meeting the committers
  • Merge topics
  • Meeting WANdisco and other company employees
  • Apache Subversion 1.8 overview
  • The opportunity to speak to technical experts
  • The networking aspect
  • Breakout sessions
  • Finding out about new best practices
  • Chance to talk to SVN committers and the power users, and the WANdisco execs
  • Knowledge and advice on merging practices and tricks to speeding up transactions
  • Branching best practices
  • Hook scripts
  • Committer discussions
If you attended the event and have yet to provide feedback, you can either comment on this post, tweet us, or Contact Us directly. We’re already planning the next event, and your feedback is invaluable in helping us continue to make future Subversion Live events even better.

 

uberSVN One Year On: Your Feedback

uberSVN is one year old!

It’s been a great first year for uberSVN – the innovative, open ALM platform for Apache Subversion has won industry awards, seen the launch of its very own integrated app store, and has been making waves with the IT media. But one thing we’re particularly excited about, is the overwhelmingly positive response we’ve had from the community.

Here’s what the community has to say about uberSVN.

  • Your team using SVN? Use it collaboratively the right way @ubersvn is awesome!
  • I’m going to give uberSVN a proper go and look to potentially swap out VisualSVN/CruiseControl.net
  • About to install uberSVN to see what all the fuss is about #uberSVN
  • @WANdisco @uberSVN you guys are awesome. Seriously the first svn installer for linux that *just works* =)
  • Just wanted to thank all of you for the amazing job that has been done in uberSVN
  • Congratulations to WANdisco and their innovative techniques in source code management

Tell us about yourself Rob?

I’m a ColdFusion developer, I’ve been at it for over fifteen years. I’m also a huge fan of jQuery, and really, technology in general. I’m a big proponent of MVC/OO frameworks, and I go out of my way to write good code. For the past three years, I’ve been living full time in an RV. I move around to where the work is, it’s the best way to stay employed. I’ve lived in San Jose for a couple of years, where I worked for eBay and Adobe. On top of that, I’ve been developing some specialized software for this new business that will dramatically reduce the amount of time required to match properties with buyers.

What revision control did you previously employ?

My first introduction to version control was with Source Safe many years ago. From there, I moved to SVN and was confused for a while until I figured it out. For one project, I used the “free” single project account at Codesion. I was on the verge of upgrading that account when, one day, I was minding my own business and reading my Twitter feed, when I saw a posting about “uberSVN” from Wandisco. I hit paydirt! I downloaded their free SVN server and installed it on my Windows server and had it running in under ten minutes. I now have eight or nine repositories running on it, and I back them up via Carbonite.

What do you use uberSVN for?

I currently have several clients, each one with multiple projects. One of them already uses SVN at another location, but the other does not. Since I work from multiple computers, SVN makes it much simpler to keep my code centralized.

Do you have a tip for uberSVN users?

The only tip right now is, if you’re on the fence, just DO it! It’s super simple to setup and administer. A few years ago, I spent three days configuring SVN on a Linux machine and hooking it to Apache. That was a giant PITA. uberSVN was up and running in ten minutes. No joke.

What would you like to see in future releases of uberSVN?

Integration with bug trackers like Bugzilla.

  • I think this is a great value point for uberSVN. I have had to learn to install and administrate Subversion, MediaWiki, Mantis Bug tracker, and Jenkins. However I was hired to write software and that’s what I love. All of this administrating, while also a fun puzzle, is cutting into my software time. Backup and bare metal restore is a concern as all these diverse tools and stacks need to be configured or work with various 3rd party plugins, etc. Centralized management of these diverse but useful tools is a goal that I think will be rewarded and well appreciated. I wish you success and hope to start using uberSVN for production work soon!

  • First of all the software itself is amazing, the GUI is so user friendly that anybody could do it, the installation itself is as easy as 1 2 3, streamlined updates are amazing (To be perfectly honest I was worrying about
    updating it; all the worries were in vain) and the fact that it works is what makes me happy. The team kind of disbanded but in the short period of time that we were together; I never heard a single complaint about it other than the usual “Corin you broke the user permissions again” due to me still being new to the software. Other than that, I have no problems and am pleased with the fact that you are letting people use such professional software for free.

Tell us about yourself Dan…

I’m a Java developer working on some new trading functionality for a project that’s been established for around 5 years. We actively support three major versions, and provide occasional fixes in older releases.

What revision control did you previously employ?

First off, we were using IBM Rational ClearCase, and were really beginning to struggle with ConfigSpec. One incorrect Configspec would set us so far back in our project – it was a real headache! Even worse, ClearCase requires each user to create and manage a new branch everytime a developer wants to work on the code – this forces you to write a new ClearCase ConfigSpec to use the branch! As out project grew, ClearCase was becoming more and more difficult to maintain, and we didn’t have the resources needed to maintain it, both in terms of staff and the finances for ongoing professional support. We started off looking at some open source alternatives to ClearCase; not just to eliminate the licensing fees, but because of all the online tutorials and guidelines you can find for most open source solutions. And, I use plenty of open source in my own personal projects, so I’m a big advocate of open source!

What prompted you to switch to uberSVN?

The learning curve of moving from ClearCase to Subversion was the major factor! There was a lot we really liked about Subversion, but in the first few weeks our productivity was flagging. uberSVN really helped here – it was easy-to-use, particularly for our systems administrator. The other big draw, was uberSVN’s activities feeds. Our team is split between three sites, keeping co-ordinated can be a real pain, so it’s really useful to get up-to-the-minute alerts on what other team members are working on.

Do you have a tip for uberSVN users?

Try out the uberAPPS tab in the dashboard! We’re running Jenkins inside uberSVN at the moment. No one on the team has ever used Jenkins before, but through uberAPPS it was easy to download and install, and we really like how every time code is committed to Subversion, Jenkins runs all of our tests. We also get a notification in uberSVN everytime a new release of Jenkins becomes available, so that’s one less update site we need to keep an eye on!

Finally, what do you feel is missing from uberSVN?

It would be great if uberSVN integrated with at least one open source defect tracker, maybe Bugzilla or Trac!

Need some extra help with your uberSVN implementation? Professional support for uberSVN is available. You can also suggest any new features you’d like to see in uberSVN, at our dedicated Suggestions forum, or get free community support at SVNForum.org.

What You’re Saying About uberSVN

At WANdisco, we’re always excited to hear from the community, and we’ve been overwhelmed by the great feedback we’ve received from uberSVN users. Here is a selection of the comments you’ve sent us, about our award winning, open ALM platform for Apache Subversion.

  • Great work, very easy install, so now I can focus on coding instead of on installing svn again.
  • Thanks for making me aware of this ubersvn.com installed on Windows server with ease
  • I installed uberSVN in less than 5 minutes on my iMAC running OS X Lion in less than 5 minutes this morning!
  • It looks very promising, the setup was a breeze.
  • @WANdisco @uberSVN you guys are awesome. Seriously the first svn installer for linux that *just works* =)
  • The installation itself is as easy as 1 2 3, streamlined updates are amazing (To be perfectly honest I was worrying about updating it; all the worries were in vain) and the fact that it works is what makes me happy.

  • I think this is a great value point for uberSVN. I have had to learn to install and administrate Subversion, MediaWiki, Mantis Bug tracker, and Jenkins. However I was hired to write software and that’s what I love. All of this administrating, while also a fun puzzle, is cutting into my software time. Backup and bare metal restore is a concern as all these diverse tools and stacks need to be configured or work with various 3rd party plugins, etc. Centralized management of these diverse but useful tools is a goal that I think will be rewarded and well appreciated. I wish you success and hope to start using uberSVN for production work soon!

  • It sure is better than what we were doing in the past… create a build, copy the build to a build and date specific folder, and then copy that folder to two other computers and hope that all of the code writers read each other’s code. At this point we’re good to go.
  • Just wanted to thank all of you for the amazing job that has been done in uberSVN.
  • Congratulations to WANdisco and their innovative techniques in source code management
  • uberSVN is working flawlessy and setting it up has been really fast and easy. I have only good words regarding the product, your company and its commitment to open source and the Apache Foundation (I’m an ASF member and committer myself in my spare time).
  • The software itself is amazing, the GUI is so user friendly that anybody could do it.
  • Great product! Was looking for this for years.
  • I was trying to get remote SVN working properly for ages.. took about 20 minutes with ubersvn.com, works perfectly
  • Moved home repos to uberSVN, best SVNserver GUI I’ve seen. Will have to have a look at the enterprise offerings… ubersvn.com

Are you using uberSVN? Then we’d love to hear your thoughts! Simply post a comment at the blog, or email or Tweet us. And, if you’ve yet to try uberSVN, then why not give it a go? It’s free to download, and free to use, and comes integrated with an uberAPPS store, which contains useful apps for Subversion developers, such as Jenkins and uTest.

We hope you enjoy using uberSVN!