Tag Archive for 'asf'

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Subversion Live 2012:Keynote

After a first day that covered hook scripts, Subversion server tuning and best practices, and still found time for a Birds of a Feather Open Session, there was even more good stuff to come at the second day of Subversion Live London.

Day two featured an afternoon of breakout sessions that took in the new Apache Bloodhound project, branching and merging, move tracking, continuous delivery, and more.

The day kicked off bright and early, with a keynote delivered by Greg Stein, the Vice President of Apache Subversion at the ASF.

Despite the early hour, Greg delivered his ‘Why Subversion Still Matters’ keynote to a full room. Over the course of an hour, he covered the entire history of the world’s most popular version control system, from the initial “Inversion” filesystem design, to the first Milestone releases, and finally onto Subversion 1.7 as we know it today, complete with enterprise features that are seeing SVN gain increasing adoption within enterprise environments.

Greg also shared the story of how the team assumed Subversion 0.14.0 would mark a turning point in SVN’s development, with future development being concerned only with “bugfix and minor features from now on.” This was backed up by a slide aptly titled “What Were We Thinking?!?”

Greg shared his thoughts on maintaining and managing an open source community, stressing the importance of making developers feel a part of this community by granting them committer privileges. This encourages Subversion’s long-term health – inevitably, some developers will leave the project, but there are always new committers joining.

Of course, any ‘Why Subversion Still Matters’ talk ultimately boils down to the hotly-contested question of whether SVN is still relevant, and whether the future of version control really lies with distributed systems such as Git. Greg pointed out that when you use services such as GitHub, you effectively make your distributed version control centralized again, but ultimately took a refreshingly pragmatic approach, advising that version control systems are just a tool and you should simply choose the right one for your needs.

After covering the ins-and-outs of Subversion’s past, there was just enough time to look to the future. Greg assured attendees that the committers are “always improving merging and merge conflict detection,” and that, although future releases will feature more disconnection, they will still maintain a canonical server.

Despite taking in the entire history of Subversion and looking ahead to future releases, many attendees took advantage of the opportunity to put further questions to Greg Stein after the session had ended.

Subversion Tip of the Week

Getting More out of ‘SVN Status’

When using Apache Subversion from the command line, you always begin the command with ‘svn’ followed by a subcommand. However, after this you can add some optional switches. Although you can use the same switch with different subcommands, each switch means the same thing regardless of the subcommand it’s paired with.

Switches can be crucial in controlling your subcommands. This week, we’ll cover some useful Subversion switches you may not be aware of.

1) ‘Show Updates’ Switch

This switch can be used to view the list of paths changed in your repository, since your last ‘svn update.’ This is achieved using the ‘svn status’ command followed by the ‘-u’ switch.

The output will look something like this:

2) ‘Verbose’ Switch

To view the revision information for every item, use the ‘svn status’ command, followed by the ‘–verbose’ switch and then your working copy path:

SVN Status –verbose {PATH}

For example:

This will display information on every file:

The first column (after the file’s path) shows the working-revision of the item, while the second and third column show the revision in which the item last changed, and who changed it.

WANdisco’s September Roundup

We have loads of exciting news for you this month, including a new release of Apache Subversion and the very first release of Apache Bloodhound, an exclusive podcast with Vice President of Subversion at the ASF Greg Stein, and of course, the news that SmartSVN has joined our existing suite of Subversion based products and services.

But first, we were proud to open a new development centre in Belfast, Ireland earlier this month. While in Belfast announcing the opening of our new office, David Richards, co-founder, CEO and President of WANdisco, met with Minister for Enterprise, Trade and Investment, Arlene Foster.

“We are aiming to achieve substantial growth within the next three years and the Belfast centre will play a critical role in that growth,” said David Richards. “Our strategy includes further development of our existing suite of products, development of new products for the high-growth ‘Big Data’ market and further expansion into Europe and China.”

Not content with one big announcement, we also brought you the news that we’ve added Syntevo’s SmartSVN product suite to our portfolio of Subversion products and services.

For those not already in the know, SmartSVN benefits Subversion end-users and system administrators, through a user interface that provides all members of a development team with a customizable overview of the most important files (e.g. conflicting, modified or missing). Other SmartSVN benefits include:

  • Complete platform independence
  • A rich set of features that takes full advantage of Subversion’s capabilities and eliminates the need for external tools
  • A customizable user interface
  • Extensive file comparison and merge utilities
  • Global customer support and training
We’re currently offering SmartSVN at 50% less than its previous cost, including one year of support! There is also a free download of SmartSVN Foundation available, which gives you the chance to trial SmartSVN Professional simply by choosing the evaluate option during installation. If you have anymore questions about what WANdisco acquiring the SmartSVN product suite means for your SmartSVN experience, we’ve just published a handy FAQ that should answer all of your queries! If not, please feel free to Contact Us directly.
This month, we also caught up with Greg Stein, the Vice President of Subversion at the Apache Software Foundation, to ask him a few questions about the Subversion 1.8 release, the ASF, and of course, his upcoming sessions at Subversion Live. You can listen to the podcast in full now and, if you haven’t booked your tickets to Subversion Live, you’ll find a bonus 30% discount code in the podcast!

Visit http://www.wandisco.com/svn-live-2012 for all the latest information on Subversion Live.

You may still have a few weeks left to register for Subversion Live, but this weekend WANdisco is attending another conference – the Jenkins User Conference in San Francisco. After having a great time at the JUC in New York we’re looking forward to meeting the Jenkins community again in San Francisco – be sure to look out for the WANdisco table, if you’re attending the JUC this weekend!
The Apache Subversion community announced another new release this month – Subversion 1.6.19 includes plenty of fixes and enhancements for users of the 1.6 series:
  • A fix for a server hang that could occur if a hook script failed to start.
  • A fix for a write-through proxy commit regression introduced in Subversion 1.6.17.
  • Partial sync drops properties when converting to adds.
  • A fix for the testsuite to avoid FAILs on APR hash order.

As ever free, certified binaries can be downloaded through our website, and also through uberSVN.

We were also excited to see the Apache Bloodhound team announce their very first release earlier this month.

Apache Bloodhound (Incubating) is a software collaboration tool based on the code base of Trac, the proven project management and issue tracking system. Bloodhound will include issue tracking, a wiki, and repository browsing.

The 0.1 incubating release includes:

  • A patched version of Trac.
  • A new dashboard view that unifies tickets, milestones and the user’s dashboard.
  • A re-theming of the interface to use bootstrap.
  • Preliminary multi-product support. This is the first step towards allowing multiple distinct products/projects to be tracked in a single environment.
  • Simplified installation with the inclusion of a number of plugins as standard.
Apache Bloodhound 0.1 incubating can be downloaded now at https://issues.apache.org/bloodhound/ Congratulations to the Apache Bloodhound team, on their first release!
Finally, we’ve been having a bit of fun this month cooking up some software-inspired memes.

Be sure to ‘like’ us on Facebook to see what else we come up with!

Subversion Tip of the Week

Creating Changelists from the Command Line

In the world of modern software development, it’s not unusual for developers to be working on multiple, unrelated changes within the same project. In these situations, Apache Subversion‘s changelists can be an invaluable tool for keeping track of which changes relate to which part of the development effort.

Changelists are labels that can be used to group related files together. Files can be added to a changelist with the ‘svn changelist’ command, followed by the name of the changelist, and the file’s path:

svn changelist “Changelist-name” {path}

In this example, we are adding a text file called ‘Wiki’ to a changelist called ‘Changelist’:

You can add as many files as you want to each changelist, and can create multiple changelists within the same working copy. If you need to check on the status of your changelists, you can use the ‘svn status’ command, followed by the location of your working copy:

This will list all the files that are associated with the different changelists in your working copy.

Tip: There are some limitations worth baring in mind when using changelists:

    • Changelists cannot be sent to the repository, and therefore cannot be shared.
    • Changelists can only be assigned to files, and not directories.
    • Files can only be assigned to one changelist at a time.

 

Subversion Tip of the Week

Relocating a Working Copy

At some point during the Apache Subversion development lifecycle, your repository may change location – and therefore get a new URL. This may be because the IP address of the server has changed, or the repository root path in the server setup could have changed.

This can be particularly problematic if you’ve put some serious effort into modifying your working copy, as it effectively prevents you from performing an ‘SVN Commit…’ In this instance, checking out a fresh working copy from the new location and porting your changes across, could be a daunting task! This is where the ‘Relocate’ command comes into play. This command rewrites all the URLs associated with the files and folders in your working copy, with the new URL.

1) Start by selecting the ‘Relocate’ command from the TortoiseSVN menu.

2) Specify the URL you want to switch to and click ‘Ok.’

3) TortoiseSVN will then relocate to the new URL.

Warning! This operation should be used with caution, as if used incorrectly it can corrupt your working copy. In this happens, the only solution is to perform a fresh checkout.

The ‘Relocate’ command should not be used to:

    • move to a different Subversion repository.
    • switch to a different branch or directory within the same repository.

Need more Subversion know-how? After getting a great response from the Apache Subversion community in 2011, Subversion Live is back for 2012, bringing the Subversion community sessions covering everything from Subversion’s future, to expert-led best practices workshops, as well as the unique opportunity to meet the core Subversion committers.

Apache Bloodhound Team Announces First Release

The first release of Apache Bloodhound is now available.

Apache Bloodhound (Incubating) is a software collaboration tool based on the code base of Trac, the proven project management and issue tracking system. Bloodhound will include issue tracking, a wiki, and repository browsing.

The 0.1 incubating release includes:

  • A patched version of Trac.
  • A new dashboard view that unifies tickets, milestones and the user’s dashboard.
  • A re-theming of the interface to use bootstrap.
  • Preliminary multi-product support. This is the first step towards allowing multiple distinct products/projects to be tracked in a single environment.
  • Simplified installation with the inclusion of a number of plugins as standard.

Apache Bloodhound 0.1 incubating can be downloaded now at https://issues.apache.org/bloodhound/

Although WANdisco are sponsoring some of the initial committers, one of the Apache Bloodhound project’s core goals is to create a strong developer community around the Trac code base in a vendor-neutral location. If you’re interested in participating in the Apache Bloodhound project, we invite you to review the information available at the ‘Getting Involved With Apache Bloodhound’ page.

Congratulations to the Apache Bloodhound team on the release!

 

Getting Started with TortoiseSVN 1.7.9

The latest release of TortoiseSVN – version 1.7.9 – has just been released. But how do you get started with the popular Apache Subversion client for Windows? In this post, we show you how to install TortoiseSVN and checkout your first working copy.

1) TortoiseSVN 1.7.9 binaries are available from http://www.wandisco.com/subversion/download#tortoise Click on the appropriate installer to download.

2) Open the installer, and select ‘Run’ when prompted.

3) You will be taken to TortoiseSVN’s setup wizard. Click ‘Next.’

4) Accept the terms in the License Agreement, and select ‘Next.’

5) In the subsequent dialog, select where TortoiseSVN should be installed and which features you want to install. Once you are happy with the configuration, click ‘Next.’

6) Click the ‘Install’ button. Once TortoiseSVN has finished installing, click the ‘Finish’ button to complete the setup process.

7) TortoiseSVN is implemented as a Windows shell extension. To perform a checkout in TortoiseSVN, right-click on the location where you wish to create a working copy, and select ‘SVN Checkout…’

8) Enter the URL of your repository and select whether you want to checkout the HEAD revision, or a particular revision number. Click ‘Ok’ to perform the checkout.

You have now successfully performed your first checkout!

Remember that TortoiseSVN can be downloaded for free from http://www.wandisco.com/subversion/download 

 

Subversion Tip of the Week

You may have noticed we’ve been running regular polls for the Apache Subversion community, and after seeing that Windows is a hugely popular OS amongst Subversion users (according to the results, at least!) we’re planning to bring you more Windows-centric content over the coming weeks. In this week’s tip, we’ll show you how to get the most out of the repository browser, using TortoiseSVN, the Subversion client for Windows. 

Getting More out of the Repo Browser

With TortoiseSVN, there is the option of interacting directly with the repository, without even creating a working copy, using TortoiseSVN’s repo browser.

    • Right-click on your screen and select ‘Repo-browser’ from the TortoiseSVN menu.

    • Specify the URL of the repository you want to access.

    • The repo browser will open automatically, displaying the contents of your specified repository.

From the repo browser, you can perform basic tasks such as opening and editing a file and examining the revision log, but it’s also possible to perform some more complex tasks:

1) Blame – selecting this option will bring up a dialog where you can select a revision to examine. Enter the revision number, or select HEAD to see the latest revision in the repository, and TortoiseBlame will open automatically.

2) Checkout a single file – this options creates a ‘sparse’ working copy, containing just the file selected.

You will be asked to confirm the file’s URL and the location where it should be created. Click ‘Ok’ to perform the checkout.

3) Copy to working copy… – it’s possible to make a copy of a file in a different part of the repository. Right-click on the file in question, and select ‘Copy to working copy…’

Select the location where you wish to create your copy and click ‘Save.’

We’ll be running more community polls over the coming weeks, allowing us to tailor our tutorials, tips, refcards, and webinars to best suit the needs of the Subversion community. Be sure to keep checking back, to make your voice heard! 

Subversion Tip of the Week

Tagging and Reverting in TortoiseSVN

Apache Subversion remembers every change made to its files and directories, which gives you the option of reverting to earlier versions of your code (useful for when you need to roll back to a revision before it all went wrong!) Tagging is an essential part of this process, giving you the option of labelling a specific revision with a handy, human-readable tag. Here’s our five step guide to creating a tag, and then reverting to that tag, a few revisions down the development line.

1) Right click on your working copy and select the ‘Branch/Tag option from the TortoiseSVN’ menu.

2) In the subsequent dialog, perform the following actions:

– select the ‘tags’ path and add the desired tag (in this example we’ll use ‘Release_5.0”)
– add a log message.
– select the revision you wish to tag.

When you are finished, select ‘OK’ to create your tag.

3) To roll back to this revision at a later date, right-click on your working copy and select ‘Show Log.’ This will bring up a list of revisions.

4) Select the revision you wish to revert to and right-click. Select ‘Revert to this revision.’ When prompted, confirm you wish to revert, and TortoiseSVN will revert to this revision.

5) Check the results of the revert and, if you’re happy with them, commit your working copy back to the repository. Warning: this will discard all the changes you made after the selected revision.

Need more Subversion know-how? After getting a great response from the Apache Subversion community in 2011, Subversion Live is back for 2012, bringing the Subversion community sessions covering everything from Subversion’s future, to expert-led best practices workshops, as well as the unique opportunity to meet the core Subversion committers.

Subversion Tip of the Week

Quickstart: Getting Started with Jenkins and Subversion

The Jenkins open source continuous integration server can be a valuable tool for Apache Subversion users. It can be configured to watch for code changes in repositories, to automatically perform builds, to notify users, and perform other useful tasks on both remote and local machines. The easiest way to integrate Jenkins with Subversion, is through uberSVN and its integrated uberAPPS store. In this easy, five step guide, we’ll walk you through installing Jenkins in uberSVN.

1) Select the ‘uberAPPS’ tab from within ‘uberSVN’ to be taken to the store front, where you can select Jenkins.
2) From the Jenkins product screen, click ‘Download Now’ to download Jenkins.

3) Once the download is complete, click ‘Activate.’
4) You will notice a new Jenkins tab appear. Select this tab to go to uberSVN’s integrated Jenkins screen.

5) From here, you can optionally decide whether to make Jenkins visible to all users, or define exactly who can access the tool.

Get started with uberSVN now – download it for free from http://www.ubersvn.com/

Need more Subversion know-how? After getting a great response from the Apache Subversion community in 2011, Subversion Live is back for 2012, bringing the Subversion community sessions covering everything from Subversion’s future, to expert-led best practices workshops, as well as the unique opportunity to meet the core Subversion committers.