Tag Archive for 'apache'

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What’s New in SmartSVN 7.5.4?

The latest release of SmartSVN, the cross-platform graphical client for Apache Subversion, features plenty of improvements you will find useful. In this post, we take a closer look at some of the functionality we’ve added to SmartSVN 7.5.4.

–ignore-ancestry

SmartSVN’s ‘switch’ option allows users to update a working copy to a different URL. This is particularly useful when you need to update your working copy to mirror a newly created branch. SmartSVN 7.5.4 adds support for the –ignore-ancestry option, which forces SmartSVN to switch to a URL even when it cannot find a common ancestor for the URL and your working copy.

JIRA Fixes

SmartSVN supports the popular JIRA issue tracker through its ‘Bugtraq’ properties option, allowing users to seamlessly integrate JIRA into the commit wizard and other modules. SmartSVN 7.5.4 fixes an internal error that could close the ‘Resolve’ dialogue, ensuring that SmartSVN’s JIRA integration continues to run smoothly.

Shell Integration Updates

In addition to being available as a standalone program, SmartSVN integrates with Windows Explorer and Mac OS X Finder, giving you the freedom to work the way you want. SmartSVN 7.5.4 includes fixes and new functionality for this integration, including:

  • Settings for shell integration are now stored

  • A fix for an internal error that could occur when working with root-level working copies (Windows)

  • A fix for a bug that could cause commands to be erroneously enabled (Windows)

Transactions

The Transactions view automatically provides information about new project revisions, ensuring users are kept up-to-date with changes being committed to the repository. If you’re using SmartSVN Professional, this Transactions window can watch for commits in any repository, keeping you informed on changes in the libraries being used by your project, or about the Subversion-related activities of your entire team.

transactions

SmartSVN 7.5.4 addresses a bug that could cause the ‘Copy Revision Number’ command to copy multiple items.

Additional Fixes

SmartSVN 7.5.4 also includes fixes for:

  • An internal error in the Merge Preview

  • An error in the SmartSVN Log that could occur when loading merged revisions

  • The “smartsvn.defaultConnectionLogging” system property failing to work

  • Trac plugin failing when querying Trac ticket db

More information on what’s new and noteworthy in this release is available at the Changelog.

Haven’t started with SmartSVN? You can claim a free trial of SmartSVN Professional 7.5.4 now.

 

Reviewing Changes with Subversion’s ‘SVN Diff’

Sometimes you need to review the differences between files and revisions, for example before you commit your changes to the repository or when you’re trying to pinpoint the revision you need to revert to. This is when Apache Subversion’s ‘svn diff’ command comes in handy, allowing you to see the differences between files and revisions by printing a line-by-line breakdown of human-readable files. This helps by showing you exactly what has changed in the specified file, at the specified revision. The results include lines prefixed by a character representing the nature of the change:

  • + Line was added

  • – Line was deleted

  • A blank space represents no change

The ‘svn diff’ command can be used to perform several different tasks:

  • View Local Modifications

When ‘svn diff’ is performed on a working copy, it prints line-by-line information on all local modifications:

svn diff (working-copy-path)

svn diff

  • Compare Different Revisions

To use the ‘svn diff’ command to compare different revisions of the same file, use the ‘-r’ switch:

svn diff -r(number):(number) (working-copy-path)/filename

svn diff 2

This command also works at the repository level.

svn diff 3

Additional Options

  • –notice-ancestry

By default ‘svn diff’ ignores the ancestry of file(s), but you can force Subversion to take ancestry into consideration by adding the –notice-ancestry switch.

  • –show-copies-as-adds

By default, ‘svn diff’ displays the content difference for a file created by a copy command, as a delta against the original file. Adding this switch forces Subversion to display the copied content as though it’s a brand new file.

 

WANdisco Files Three New Patents with USPTO

We are pleased to announce the filing of three new patents with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) related to distributed computing.

These three innovations involve methods, devices and systems that enhance security, reliability, flexibility and efficiency in the field of distributed computing. The patents are expected to have significant benefits for users of our new Hadoop Big Data product line.

Our team continues to break new ground in the field of distributed computing technology,” said David Richards, CEO for WANdisco. “We are proud to have some of the world’s most talented engineers in this field working for us and look forward to the eventual approval of these most recent patent applications. We are particularly excited about their application in our new Big Data product line.”

Our Big Data product line includes Non-Stop NameNode, which turns the NameNode into an active-active shared-nothing cluster, and the comprehensive wizard-driven management dashboard ‘WANdisco Hadoop Console.’ We also offer a free-to-download, fully-tested and production-ready version of Apache Hadoop 2. Visit the WANdisco Distro (WDD) to learn more.

This news comes after we announced the issuance of our “Distributed computing systems and system components thereof” patent, which covers the fundamentals of active-active replication over a Wide Area Network.

 

Subversion Tip of the Week

SVN Revert

Apache Subversion’s ‘svn revert’ command allows you to discard local changes on a file or directory and replace it with the version in the repository. This saves you the overhead of performing a fresh checkout, and is also helpful when you need to quickly resolve a conflict.

To revert the changes on a single file, run the ‘svn revert’ command followed by the file path:

svn revert (working-copy)/filename

svn revert

It’s also possible to revert all the changes within an entire directory using the –depth=infinity switch. When this switch is added, any files that have been changed within the specified directory are replaced with their repository equivalent:

svn revert –depth=infinity (working-copy)

svn revert infinity

Useful Additional Commands

  • svn status

Before discarding your local changes, you may want to review exactly which files have been altered at the working copy level by using the ‘svn status’ command:

svn status (working-copy-path)

svn status

  • svn diff

The ‘svn diff’ command prints all the changes that have been made to human-readable files within the working copy, which is useful for identifying the file(s) you want to revert. Each line is prefixed by a character representing the nature of the change:

  1. + Line was added
  2. – Line was deleted
  3. A blank space represents no change

To run ‘svn diff’ enter the following command:

svn diff (working-copy-path)

svn diff

Looking for an easy-to-use cross platform Subversion client? Claim your free 30 day trial of SmartSVN Professional by visiting: www.smartsvn.com/download

 

 

Switch your Subversion Working Copy

Apache Subversion’s ‘svn switch’ command allows users to update a working copy to a different URL. This is useful when you need to update your working copy to mirror a newly-created branch.

Although it’s possible to achieve the same effect by performing a fresh checkout, the ‘svn switch’ command is a quicker alternative. It saves you the overhead of running ‘svn checkout,’ and applies the changes required to bring your working copy inline with the new location, making it a very efficient command. It also preserves any changes you’ve made in the working copy.

To perform a switch, run ‘svn switch’ followed by the URL path you wish to mirror. Apache Subversion will then go ahead and update your working copy.

svn switch

Additional Options

There are some additional options you can apply to fine-tune the ‘svn switch’ command:

  • Ignore Ancestry

If Subversion cannot find a common ancestor for the URL and your working copy, it will block the operation and display an error message.

svn switch 2

It is possible to force Subversion to switch to this URL anyway, by adding the –ignore-ancestry option.

svn switch (target-URL) –ignore-ancestry

svn switch 3

  • Target a Particular Revision


You can also specify a particular revision of the URL you’re switching to. Note that Subversion defaults to the HEAD revision, if no alternate revision is specified:

svn switch -r(revision-number) (target-URL)

svn switch 4

Want more free Subversion training? We offer plenty of webinar replays available on-demand, or you can sign up for our upcoming webinars.

All About SVN Copy

Apache Subversion’s commit command allows you to quickly create a copy of item(s) at both the working copy and the repository level. It’s most commonly used in creating branches.

In this tutorial, learn how to use the ‘svn copy’ command to copy file(s) in the working copy and the repository, alongside options such as copying items at specific revisions.

…in the Working Copy

The ‘svn copy’ command allows you to create a copy and place it in a new location within the working copy by running the command followed by the location of the item(s) you’re copying and the new location.

In this example, we’re creating a copy of the ‘Release3’ folder and placing it inside the ‘Releases’ directory.

svn copy (working-copy-path)/item-being-copied (working-copy-path)/item-being-created

svn copy

Check your working copy and you’ll see the file (‘Release4’) has successfully been created. Remember, this is a local change so you’ll need to perform an ‘svn commit’ to share it with the rest of your team.

svn copy 2

….in the Repository

Alternatively, you can create copies at the repository level. This change will automatically create a new revision so you’ll need to provide a log message alongside the ‘svn copy’ command.

svn copy (repository-URL)/item-being-copied -m “log message” (repository-URL)/item-being-created

svn copy 3

You can also copy item(s) as they existed in particular revisions, by specifying a revision number:

svn copy -r(revision-number) (repository-URL)/item-being-copied -m “log message” (repository-URL)/item-being-created

If no revision number is given, Subversion will default to HEAD.

 

svn copy 4

….Or Both 

Finally, you can copy item(s) between the working copy and the central repository. Note that when you’re copying to/from the repository, the usual rules apply: A log message is required, and the repo will copy the HEAD revision unless instructed otherwise.

In this example, we’re creating a copy of the “Release3” folder in the working copy and adding it to the repository as a folder called “Release5.”

svn copy 4

Want more advice on your Apache Subversion installation? We have a full series of SVN refcards for free download, covering hot topics such as branching and merging, and best practices. You can find out more at www.wandisco.com/svnref

Subversion Tip of the Week

SVN Blame

In certain situations, you may need more information about how a file changed in a particular Apache Subversion revision and crucially, who was responsible for that change. This is achieved by running the ‘svn blame’ command. This command prints each modified line of the specified file, alongside the revision number and the username of the person responsible for that change.

To run the ‘svn blame’ command, enter:

svn blame (repository-URL)/file

svn blame

However, sometimes the change may simply be an arbitrary whitespace or other formatting change. If you suspect this could be the case, the extensions switch (-x) can be used in conjunction with several other switches to filter out arbitrary changes:

  • –ignore-all-space (-w) – ignores all whitespace.
  • –ignore-space-change (-b) – ignores all changes in the amount of whitespace.
  • –ignore-eol-style – ignores changes in end-of-line-style.

In this example, we’re running ‘svn blame’ on the same file, but this time specifying that any EOL changes should be ignored.

svn blame -x –ignore-eol-style (repository-URL)/file

svn blame 2

Looking for an easy-to-use cross platform Subversion client? Claim your free 30 day trial of SmartSVN Professional by visiting: www.smartsvn.com/download

WANdisco Non-Stop NameNode Removes Hadoop’s Single Point of Failure

We’re pleased to announce the release of the WANdisco Non-Stop NameNode, the only 100% uptime solution for Apache Hadoop. Built on our Non-Stop patented technology, Hadoop’s NameNode is no longer a single point of failure, delivering immediate and automatic failover and recovery whenever a server goes offline, without any downtime or data loss.

“This announcement demonstrates our commitment to enterprises looking to deploy Hadoop in their production environments today,” said David Richards, President and CEO of WANdisco. “If the NameNode is unavailable, the Hadoop cluster goes down. With other solutions, a single NameNode server actively supports client requests and complex procedures are required if a failure occurs. The Non-Stop NameNode eliminates those issues and also allows for planned maintenance without downtime. WANdisco provides 100% uptime with unmatched scalability and performance.”

Additional benefits of Non-Stop NameNode include:

  • Every NameNode server is active and supports simultaneous read and write requests.
  • All servers are continuously synchronized.
  • Automatic continuous hot backup.
  • Immediate and automatic recovery after planned or unplanned outages, without the need for administrator intervention.
  • Protection from “split-brain” where the backup server becomes active before the active server is completely offline. This can result in data corruption.
  • Full support for HBase.
  • Works with Apache Hadoop 2.0 and CDH 4.1.

“Hadoop was not originally developed to support real-time, mission critical applications, and thus its inherent single point of failure was not a major issue of concern,” said Jeff Kelly, Big Data Analyst at Wikibon. “But as Hadoop gains mainstream adoption, traditional enterprises rightly are looking to Hadoop to support both batch analytics and mission critical apps. With WANdisco’s unique Non-Stop NameNode approach, enterprises can feel confident that mission critical applications running on Hadoop, and specifically HBase, are not at risk of data loss due to a NameNode failure because, in fact, there is no single NameNode. This is a major step forward for Hadoop.”

You can learn more about the Non-Stop NameNode at the product page, where you can also claim your free trial.

If you’d like to get first-hand experience of the Non-Stop NameNode and are attending the Strata Conference in Santa Clara this week, you can find us at booth 317, where members of the WANdisco team will be doing live demos of Non-Stop NameNode throughout the event.

Subversion Tip of the Week

SVN Import

There are two main options when you need to add new file(s) to your Apache Subversion project: the ‘SVN Add’ command and ‘SVN Import.’ The advantage of performing an ‘SVN Import’ is that:

  • ‘SVN Import’ communicates directly with the repository, so no working copy or checkout is required.
  • Your files are immediately committed to the repository, and are therefore available to the rest of the team.
  • Intermediate directories that don’t already exist in the repository are automatically created without the need for additional switches.

‘SVN Import’ is typically used when you have a local file tree that’s being added to your Subversion project. Run the following to add a file/file tree to your repository:

svn import -m “log message” (local file/file tree path) (repository-URL)

In this example, we’re adding the contents of the “Release2” folder to the repository, in an existing ‘branches’ directory.

svn import 1

As already mentioned, intermediate directories do not need to exist prior to running the ‘SVN Import’ command. In this example, we’re again importing the contents of ‘Release2,’ but this time we’re simultaneously creating a ‘Release2’ directory to contain the files.

svn import create new folder

If you check the repository, you’ll see a new ‘Release2’ directory has been created. The contents of your ‘Release2’ file tree are located inside.

ubersvn import

Want more advice on your Apache Subversion installation? We have a full series of SVN refcards for free download, covering hot topics such as branching and merging, and best practices. You can find out more at www.wandisco.com/svnref

Adding and Deleting Files from the Command Line

When working with files under Apache Subversion’s version control, eventually you will need to start adding and removing files from your project. This week’s tip explains how to add a file to a project at the working copy level or, alternatively, commit it straight to the central repository. It will also highlight how to delete a file, either by scheduling it for deletion via the working copy or deleting it straight from the central repository.

Adding Files

Files can be added to a project via the working copy. After you’ve added the file to your working copy, it’ll be sent to the central repository and shared with the rest of your team the next time you perform an ‘svn commit.’

To add a file to your working copy (and schedule it for addition the next time you perform a commit) run:

svn add (working-copy-location)/file-to-be-added

In this example we’re adding a file called ‘executable’ to the trunk directory of the ‘NewRepo’ working copy.

Subversion 1

You’ll need to perform a commit to send this item to the repository and share it with the rest of your team.

Subversion 2

Deleting Files 

Once you start adding files to your working copy, sooner or later you’ll need to remove files. When files are deleted in the working copy, they’re scheduled for deletion in the repository the next time you perform a commit, in exactly the same way as the ‘svn add’ command.

Schedule files for deletion in the working copy by running:

svn delete (working-copy-location)/file-to-be-deleted

In this example, we’re scheduling ‘executable.png’ for deletion.

Subversion 3

Alternatively, you can delete files from the repository immediately. Note, this operation creates a new revision and therefore requires a log message.

svn delete -m “log message” (repository-URL)/file-to-be-deleted

Subversion 4

Looking for an easy-to-use cross platform Subversion client? Claim your free 30 day trial of SmartSVN Professional by visiting: www.smartsvn.com/download