Tag Archive for 'apache software foundation'

Application Specific Data? It’s So 2013

Looking back at the past 10 years of software the word ‘boring’ comes to mind.  The buzzwords were things like ‘web services’, ‘SOA’.  CIO’s Tape drives 70sloved the promise of these things but they could not deliver.  The idea of build once and reuse everywhere really was the ‘nirvana’.

Well it now seems like we can do all of that stuff.

As I’ve said before Big Data is not a great name because it implies that all we are talking about a big database with tons of data.  Actually that’s only part of the story. Hadoop is the new enterprise applications platform.  The key word there is platform.  If you could have a single general-purpose data store that could service ‘n’ applications then the whole of notion of database design is over.  Think about the new breed of apps on a cell phone, the social media platforms and web search engines.  Most of these do this today.  Storing data in a general purpose, non-specific data store and then used by a wide variety of applications.  The new phrase for this data store is a ‘data lake’ implying a large quantum of every growing and changing data stored without any specific structure

Talking to a variety of CIOs recently they are very excited by the prospect of both amalgamating data so it can be used and also bringing into play data that previously could not be used.  Unstructured data in a wide variety of formats like word documents and PDF files.  This also means the barriers to entry are low.  Many people believe that adopting Hadoop requires a massive re-skilling of the workforce.  It does but not in the way most people think.  Actually getting the data into Hadoop is the easy bit (‘data ingestion‘ is the new buzz-word).  It’s not like the old relational database days where you first had to model the data using data normalization techniques and then use ETL to make the data in usable format.  With a data lake you simply set up a server cluster and load the data. Creating a data model and using ETL is simply not required.

The real transformation and re-skilling is in application development.  Applications are moving to data – today in a client-server world it’s the other way around.  We have seen this type of reskilling before like moving from Cobol to object oriented programming.

In the same way that client-server technology disrupted  mainframe computer systems, big data will disrupt client-server.  We’re already seeing this in the market today.  It’s no surprise that the most successful companies in the world today (Google, Amazon, Facebook, etc.) are all actually big data companies.  This isn’t a ‘might be’ it’s already happened.

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About David Richards

David is CEO, President and co-founder of WANdisco and has quickly established WANdisco as one of the world’s most promising technology companies.

Since co-founding the company in Silicon Valley in 2005, David has led WANdisco on a course for rapid international expansion, opening offices in the UK, Japan and China. David spearheaded the acquisition of Altostor, which accelerated the development of WANdisco’s first products for the Big Data market. The majority of WANdisco’s core technology is now produced out of the company’s flourishing software development base in David’s hometown of Sheffield, England and in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

David has become recognised as a champion of British technology and entrepreneurship. In 2012, he led WANdisco to a hugely successful listing on London Stock Exchange (WAND:LSE), raising over £24m to drive business growth.

With over 15 years’ executive experience in the software industry, David sits on a number of advisory and executive boards of Silicon Valley start-up ventures. A passionate advocate of entrepreneurship, he has established many successful start-up companies in Enterprise Software and is recognised as an industry leader in Enterprise Application Integration and its standards.

David is a frequent commentator on a range of business and technology issues, appearing regularly on Bloomberg and CNBC. Profiles of David have appeared in a range of leading publications including the Financial Times, The Daily Telegraph and the Daily Mail.

Specialties:IPO’s, Startups, Entrepreneurship, CEO, Visionary, Investor, ceo, board member, advisor, venture capital, offshore development, financing, M&A

ASF Announces Apache Bloodhound as Top-Level Project

WANdisco submitted Bloodhound to the Apache Incubator in December 2011 and our developers have been involved in the Apache Bloodhound project since its inception. So we’re pleased that today the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) officially announced Bloodhound as a Top-Level Project (TLP).

Bloodhound is a Trac-based software development collaboration tool that includes an Apache Subversion repository browser, wiki, and defect tracker. It’s also compatible with the hundreds of free plugins available for Trac, allowing users to customize their experience even further.

WANdisco received many requests for an issue tracker and at the time, open source options available for integration were limited, which is why we decided to invest in setting one up in the Apache Incubator,” said David Richards, CEO of WANdisco. “WANdisco has been actively supportive of the ASF, and we’re proud to have played a leading role in Bloodhound.”

When Bloodhound entered the incubator, while it was built on the Trac framework, it was a completely new project,” said Gary Martin, Vice President of Apache Bloodhound and WANdisco developer. “Bloodhound’s strengths lie in its powerful combination of Apache Subversion source control and robust ticket system.”

You can learn more about Apache Bloodhound, and download the latest 0.5.2 release, at the Bloodhound website.

 

Happy Holidays from WANdisco!

wandisco-christmas-2012-blog (1)

2012 has been an amazing year for WANdisco: a successful flotation, a patent approval, two acquisitions, a global series of WANdisco-organized Subversion conferences and upgrading our sponsorship of the Apache Software Foundation were just some of the highlights of the past twelve months.

We have plenty of exciting announcements planned for 2013, but for now we’d just like to thank everyone who has used our products, joined us for a webinar, eTraining or enterprise training session, picked us for your support needs, or provided us with the crucial feedback we need to make our products and services even better.

And, of course, we’d like to wish you a very happy holidays from the WANdisco Team!

Subversion Tip of the Week

Getting More out of ‘SVN Status’

When using Apache Subversion from the command line, you always begin the command with ‘svn’ followed by a subcommand. However, after this you can add some optional switches. Although you can use the same switch with different subcommands, each switch means the same thing regardless of the subcommand it’s paired with.

Switches can be crucial in controlling your subcommands. This week, we’ll cover some useful Subversion switches you may not be aware of.

1) ‘Show Updates’ Switch

This switch can be used to view the list of paths changed in your repository, since your last ‘svn update.’ This is achieved using the ‘svn status’ command followed by the ‘-u’ switch.

The output will look something like this:

2) ‘Verbose’ Switch

To view the revision information for every item, use the ‘svn status’ command, followed by the ‘–verbose’ switch and then your working copy path:

SVN Status –verbose {PATH}

For example:

This will display information on every file:

The first column (after the file’s path) shows the working-revision of the item, while the second and third column show the revision in which the item last changed, and who changed it.

Subversion Tip of the Week

Creating Changelists from the Command Line

In the world of modern software development, it’s not unusual for developers to be working on multiple, unrelated changes within the same project. In these situations, Apache Subversion‘s changelists can be an invaluable tool for keeping track of which changes relate to which part of the development effort.

Changelists are labels that can be used to group related files together. Files can be added to a changelist with the ‘svn changelist’ command, followed by the name of the changelist, and the file’s path:

svn changelist “Changelist-name” {path}

In this example, we are adding a text file called ‘Wiki’ to a changelist called ‘Changelist’:

You can add as many files as you want to each changelist, and can create multiple changelists within the same working copy. If you need to check on the status of your changelists, you can use the ‘svn status’ command, followed by the location of your working copy:

This will list all the files that are associated with the different changelists in your working copy.

Tip: There are some limitations worth baring in mind when using changelists:

    • Changelists cannot be sent to the repository, and therefore cannot be shared.
    • Changelists can only be assigned to files, and not directories.
    • Files can only be assigned to one changelist at a time.

 

Subversion Tip of the Week

Relocating a Working Copy

At some point during the Apache Subversion development lifecycle, your repository may change location – and therefore get a new URL. This may be because the IP address of the server has changed, or the repository root path in the server setup could have changed.

This can be particularly problematic if you’ve put some serious effort into modifying your working copy, as it effectively prevents you from performing an ‘SVN Commit…’ In this instance, checking out a fresh working copy from the new location and porting your changes across, could be a daunting task! This is where the ‘Relocate’ command comes into play. This command rewrites all the URLs associated with the files and folders in your working copy, with the new URL.

1) Start by selecting the ‘Relocate’ command from the TortoiseSVN menu.

2) Specify the URL you want to switch to and click ‘Ok.’

3) TortoiseSVN will then relocate to the new URL.

Warning! This operation should be used with caution, as if used incorrectly it can corrupt your working copy. In this happens, the only solution is to perform a fresh checkout.

The ‘Relocate’ command should not be used to:

    • move to a different Subversion repository.
    • switch to a different branch or directory within the same repository.

Need more Subversion know-how? After getting a great response from the Apache Subversion community in 2011, Subversion Live is back for 2012, bringing the Subversion community sessions covering everything from Subversion’s future, to expert-led best practices workshops, as well as the unique opportunity to meet the core Subversion committers.

Subversion Tip of the Week

You may have noticed we’ve been running regular polls for the Apache Subversion community, and after seeing that Windows is a hugely popular OS amongst Subversion users (according to the results, at least!) we’re planning to bring you more Windows-centric content over the coming weeks. In this week’s tip, we’ll show you how to get the most out of the repository browser, using TortoiseSVN, the Subversion client for Windows. 

Getting More out of the Repo Browser

With TortoiseSVN, there is the option of interacting directly with the repository, without even creating a working copy, using TortoiseSVN’s repo browser.

    • Right-click on your screen and select ‘Repo-browser’ from the TortoiseSVN menu.

    • Specify the URL of the repository you want to access.

    • The repo browser will open automatically, displaying the contents of your specified repository.

From the repo browser, you can perform basic tasks such as opening and editing a file and examining the revision log, but it’s also possible to perform some more complex tasks:

1) Blame – selecting this option will bring up a dialog where you can select a revision to examine. Enter the revision number, or select HEAD to see the latest revision in the repository, and TortoiseBlame will open automatically.

2) Checkout a single file – this options creates a ‘sparse’ working copy, containing just the file selected.

You will be asked to confirm the file’s URL and the location where it should be created. Click ‘Ok’ to perform the checkout.

3) Copy to working copy… – it’s possible to make a copy of a file in a different part of the repository. Right-click on the file in question, and select ‘Copy to working copy…’

Select the location where you wish to create your copy and click ‘Save.’

We’ll be running more community polls over the coming weeks, allowing us to tailor our tutorials, tips, refcards, and webinars to best suit the needs of the Subversion community. Be sure to keep checking back, to make your voice heard! 

Commitment to the Cause

“There’s a difference between interest and commitment. When you’re interested in doing something, you do it only when circumstance permit. When you’re committed to something, you accept no excuses, only results.”

I think it’s a wonderful quote, primarily because it’s true.  There really are only two options regarding commitment, you’re either in or you’re out. There’s no such thing in life as inbetween.  WANdisco is very much “in” when it comes to Apache Subversion.

Today we made a couple of very important announcements.

  1. We upped our sponsor level of the ASF from Bronze to Silver.
  2. We increased the number of full-time subversion committers by hiring two of the most experienced Subversion engineers in Branko Čibej and Stefan Fuhrmann.

The ASF is a non-profit, volunteer-run foundation and this will help aid organizational, legal and financial support for a broad range of Apache licensed projects including Subversion. We continue to be extremely grateful to the ASF.  This is a ‘safe home’ for Subversion.  Apache have led the way in community open source development since 1999 and they are no stranger to mature, pervasive open source technology like Subversion.

Branko and Stefan are two wonderful software engineers with lot’s of experience in the SVN community.  Branko has been involved in the project since 2000 and he has always worked on some of the most difficult and complex problems.  Karl Fogel told me a long time ago that he could really help deliver the branching and merging improvements we hope to make.

Stefan has worked on the Subversion client TortoiseSVN since 2003 and now spans both client and server.

I think this is great news for the community as a whole.

This announcement coincides with the second year of our Subversion Live Conferences.

The first year we ran the events they were a huge success.  It presented a unique opportunity for Subversion users from a wide spectrum of organizations to interact with each other and the core Subversion developers.  Registration is now open here:  http://www.wandisco.com/svn-live-2012

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About David Richards

David is CEO, President and co-founder of WANdisco and has quickly established WANdisco as one of the world’s most promising technology companies.

Since co-founding the company in Silicon Valley in 2005, David has led WANdisco on a course for rapid international expansion, opening offices in the UK, Japan and China. David spearheaded the acquisition of Altostor, which accelerated the development of WANdisco’s first products for the Big Data market. The majority of WANdisco’s core technology is now produced out of the company’s flourishing software development base in David’s hometown of Sheffield, England and in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

David has become recognised as a champion of British technology and entrepreneurship. In 2012, he led WANdisco to a hugely successful listing on London Stock Exchange (WAND:LSE), raising over £24m to drive business growth.

With over 15 years’ executive experience in the software industry, David sits on a number of advisory and executive boards of Silicon Valley start-up ventures. A passionate advocate of entrepreneurship, he has established many successful start-up companies in Enterprise Software and is recognised as an industry leader in Enterprise Application Integration and its standards.

David is a frequent commentator on a range of business and technology issues, appearing regularly on Bloomberg and CNBC. Profiles of David have appeared in a range of leading publications including the Financial Times, The Daily Telegraph and the Daily Mail.

Specialties:IPO’s, Startups, Entrepreneurship, CEO, Visionary, Investor, ceo, board member, advisor, venture capital, offshore development, financing, M&A

Introduction to Apache Subversion

What is Apache Subversion?

Subversion is an Apache-licensed, open source software versioning and version control system that can track changes to files, folders and directories. It can also be used to recover previous versions of data, and examine the history of how a particular dataset has changed. Subversion can operate across networks, encouraging collaboration by allowing team members at various locations to work on the same set of data. Subversion can be used to manage any collection of files – web pages, binaries, documentation – not just source code!

Downloading and Installing Apache Subversion

Certified open source Apache Subversion binaries are available to download from http://www.wandisco.com/subversion/download

To install, open the file to launch the setup wizard and follow the onscreen instructions to define which components you wish to install, and the install location. Enter the name of your server, the host port, and define the repository and repository location prefix – and hit install.

Alternatively, uberSVN makes Subversion easy and intuitive to use, and is free to download and free to use.

Creating your first repository

Once Subversion is installed, the first thing you need to do is create a repository. To create your first repository, open the command line, change the current directory to where you want to create your repository, and run the ‘svnadmin’ command:

svnadmin create {directory name}

Checking out a Project

To start working on your project, you must check out a working copy of the repository. This is achieved with the ‘checkout’ command:

svn checkout file {file location}

Commit Your Changes

Once you’ve made some changes to your working copy, you’ll want to push your changes to the server. Perform an “svn update” and an “svn diff” to test your changes, and resolve any warnings raised by Subversion, before committing. Once you’ve finished checking your modifications, and are ready to store the new revision in the repository, run the ‘commit’ command:

svn commit {path}

Get other people’s changes

When someone else performs a commit to the repository, you’ll need to pull those changes into your working copy, to ensure the latest trunk changes are compatible with what you’re doing in your working copy. Changes can be pulled into your working copy with the update command:

svn update {file name}
or
svn update {directory name}

Adding Files to a Project

Now you know how to checkout a working copy and commit changes back to the repository – but as you continue to develop your working copy, you may wish to add some new files to your project. When adding new files to Subversion, you need to tell the Subversion server about the files with the following command:

svn add {file name}
or
svn add {directory name}

Note that the new files won’t appear in the repository until you perform an ‘svn commit’ and send them to the repository.

Deleting Files from a Project

If at some point you want to remove these files from Subversion, run the delete command:

svn delete {file name}
or
svn delete {directory name}

Again, you must perform a commit before the file is deleted from the repository. You can also run ‘svn list’ to confirm that the file was successfully deleted from the repository.

And if you get stuck…..

The ‘svn –help’ function provides a summary of available commands or, for more information on a particular command, use:

svn help {command}

Other useful commands

  • svn status {path} – prints the status of working copy files and directories.
  • svn diff – display the differences between two revisions.
  • svn merge – applies the differences between two sources to a working copy path.
  • svn move SRC DST – think of this as ‘svn copy’ that automatically deletes the source file. This command moves a file or directory in your working copy, or in the repository. Note that Subversion does not support cross-repository moving, so it is impossible to move files across repositories with this command.
  • svn list – allows you to view the content of the Subversion repository, without having to download a working copy.
  • svn log – Subversion remembers every change made to your files and directories. This command displays the commit log messages. By default, it will show the information for the current working directory of your working copy. Alternatively, different paths can be specified.

Need more info?

On June 14th, 2012 we will be hosting a free ‘Introduction to Subversion’ webinar. This course is intended as a primer for new users or people who are thinking of making the jump to Subversion, and will cover the following topics:

  • Repository basics – creating and organizing
  • Checkouts, working folders, editing files and checkins
  • Reporting on changes
  • Simple branching
  • Simple merging

This webinar is free to attend, but places are limited so register now to avoid disappointment.

Congratulations to Apache on ‘Unprecedented Growth’

As a proud sponsor of the Apache Software Foundation, WANdisco are excited to see that the ASF has announced “unprecedented growth” for the first quarter of 2012.

The ASF describes this quarter as “record setting” – which is good news for Apache’s community of top-level projects (including Apache Subversion!) incubating innovations, and of course all of the committers, contributors and users.

“Our landmark success can be attributed to Apache’s longstanding commitment to providing exceptional Open Source products, each with a stable codebase and an active community,” said ASF President Jim Jagielski. “The ASF makes it easy for all contributors, regardless of any affiliations, to collaborate.”

At WANdisco, we’re convinced open source solutions are only increasing in popularity and are also enjoying growth in the enterprise. We believe the ASF’s announcement is further proof that this is the case.

Congratulations, Apache!