Tag Archive for 'ALM'

uberSVN ‘Chimney House’ Release 8 Released

We’re pleased to announce a new release of uberSVN, the free, open ALM platform from WANdisco. The new uberSVN ‘Chimney House’ Release 8 ships with Apache Subversion versions 1.7.8 and 1.6.20, and introduces some new features and fixes, including:

  • The system-wide ability to handle case insensitivity. A new toggle within the Admin > Preferences tab allows you to specify whether usernames should be case insensitive or not.
  • A fix for Subversion password and authz files not being regenerated, an issue that could result in authentication problems.
  • A fix for formatting errors that could result in difficulties using LDAP for uberSVN logins.

More information on what’s new and noteworthy is available at the uberSVN release notes. uberSVN can be downloaded for free from www.wandisco.com/ubersvn

Subversion Tip of the Week

Polling Subversion with Jenkins

There are many advantages Jenkins can offer Apache Subversion users, one of which is the option of automatically polling Subversion repositories for changes, and creating a new build whenever changes are detected. In this week’s tip, we’ll show you how to configure Jenkins to automatically poll an uberSVN repository.

(Note, this tutorial requires Jenkins to be installed in uberSVN. See Getting Started with Jenkins in uberSVN for a step-by-step guide to getting Jenkins up and running.)

1. Open the ‘Jenkins’ tab and select the ‘New Job’ option from the left-hand menu.

2. Enter a Name for your job and indicate whether you are wanting to Copy Existing Job. Click ‘Ok.’

3. You will be taken to the ‘Configure’ screen. Enter a description for your job and select ‘Subversion’ as the source code management option. You will then be asked to enter the URL of the repository you wish to link the job to.

4. Under ‘Build Triggers’ select ‘Poll SCM.’ In the ‘Schedule’ text box, enter how often you want Jenkins to poll the repository. You can specify the frequency that Jenkins will poll Subversion, using the following format:

MINUTE HOUR DOM MONTH DOW
MINUTE: Minutes within the hour (0-59)
HOUR: The hour of the day (0-23)
DOM: The day of the month (1-31)
MONTH: The month (1-12)
DOW: The day of the week (0-7) where 0 and 7 are Sunday.

@annually, @yearly, @monthly, @weekly, @daily, @midnight, and @hourly are also supported.

5. Click ‘Save’ and Jenkins will begin automatically polling your Subversion repository at the specified intervals.

Not yet started with uberSVN? It’s free to download and free to use. Visit http://www.ubersvn.com/ now to get started.

Subversion Tip of the Week

Advanced Subversion Polling with Jenkins

It’s common practice to work on different projects simultaneously, but with so much going on it’s easy to lose track of where files originated, and what version is being used by which project. Thankfully, Jenkins supports file fingerprinting, which allows you to see exactly when and where your files are being produced and used. Once you’ve configured a Jenkins job to poll Subversion, setting up file fingerprinting is made easy with uberSVN.

1. Select the ‘Jenkins’ tab, followed by the Jenkins job you previously setup to poll Subversion.

2. Select the ‘Configure’ option.

3. Select the ‘Record fingerprints of files to track usage’ option and specify which files to track in the ‘Files to fingerprint’ text box. In this example, trunk/*.zip will track all .zip files in the trunk.

5. Make some changes to the files earmarked for fingerprinting, and commit those changes as normal.

6. Open the build report in Jenkins and select ‘See Fingerprints.’

7. This screen will display some basic details about the tracked files. To drill down into the information on any file, select the ‘more details’ link.

uberSVN is free to download and free to use. Visit http://www.ubersvn.com/ now to download your copy.

WANdisco’s October Roundup

This month was a busy one for WANdisco and the Subversion community, with new releases of Apache Subversion, SmartSVN and uberSVN and of course, WANdisco’s very own global Subversion conference series, Subversion Live.

Subversion Live 2012 took place in San Francisco; Greenwich Connecticut, and London, bringing attendees sessions covering everything from Subversion’s future, expert-led best practice workshops focused on getting the most out of Subversion and a unique ‘Roundtable with the Committers’ session. Attendees had the opportunity to meet and put their questions to the core Subversion committers, in addition to networking with their fellow Subversion users.

We’ve had fantastic feedback from the community; here’s just some of the comments we’ve received about Subversion Live 2012:

  • Thanks for running the conference. It was really helpful. The SVN folks I met were great. A lot more approachable than the typical geek gathering!
  • Thank you very much for the information you passed to me over the Subversion conference, I have now installed uberSVN on my laptop and have started to play with it. I have also signed up for a few webinars in November to kick off some internal training. I really enjoyed the conference, it was very well put together. You and your staff are a very friendly and helpful team which made the event a pleasure to attend.
  • I look forward to attending next year’s event, with a bit more experience under my belt I hope to have some challenging questions for your developers.

See what else attendees have been saying, at our Subversion Live 2012 feedback blog. You can also find out more about the different Subversion Live sessions by reading our recaps of Day One and Day Two, and an in-depth look at the Subversion Live Keynote, and the What’s Coming in 1.8: Overview session.

The Apache Subversion community released another update to the SVN 1.7 series this month, with the release of Apache Subversion 1.7.7. This featured even more fixes and enhancements, including:

  • A fix for a memory read bug
  • Unknown password stores in configuration files no longer cause errors
  • “All tests successful” is now printed at the end of ‘make check’
  • Fixes for issues that could occur when applying Git patch files
  • Status no longer descends into dir externals following upgrade

A full list of what’s new can be found in the Apache Subversion Changes file. As ever, the latest binaries are available to download from the WANdisco website.

Subversion 1.7.7 binaries are also available through uberSVN, the free-to-download, free-to-use, open ALM platform, which was also updated this month. uberSVN ‘Chimney House’ Release 7 is the final release in uberSVN’s ‘Chimney House’ series, and features a new license comparison tool, in addition to a list of fixes and enhancements. The license comparison tool ensures that users are fully aware of license changes, through a pop-up that displays the current license information and compares it to the incoming license prior to installation.

Other updates include:

  • A navigation warning that alerts the user if they attempt to navigate away from the LDAP locations page without saving.
  • The ability to perform other actions in the uberSVN UI whilst update packages are being downloaded (admins only.)
  • Apache Subversion 1.6.19 and 1.7.7 binaries shipped with all new downloads.
  • Removing LDAP locations now presents a warning and option to remove the associated users.

More information on all the changes included in uberSVN ‘Chimney House’ Release 7 is available at the Release Notes.

We were particularly excited to announce the first SmartSVN release since we acquired the popular graphical client last month. SmartSVN 7.0.7 brings some useful enhancements and fixes to the SmartSVN community, more information is available at the SmartSVN 7.0.7 blog post.

If you have any comments or suggestions for upcoming releases, you can post your ideas directly to the SmartSVN team at our dedicated SmartSVN Suggestions forum.

There’s been lots of exciting press activity this month, including articles in MoneyWeek and Investors Chronicle. WANdisco was also featured in Talk Business, which welcomed WANdisco CEO and co-founder David Richards as their latest technology columnist in residence this month. In his first article for the publication, ‘Our Man in the Valley,’ David dishes the dirt on life as a tech company in Silicon Valley. David Richards also shared his top three ways to reduce software development costs at the WANdisco blog, covering:

  • Continuous Integration/Continuous Delivery
  • Highly Available Source Code
  • Software Development without Geographic Constraints

If you’re looking to run leaner, meaner and drive IT costs down, be sure to read David’s  ‘Three Unconventional Ways to Manage IT Costs’ post.

uberSVN ‘Chimney House’ Release 7

We’re pleased to announce the release of uberSVN ‘Chimney House’ Release 7. This is the final release in uberSVN’s ‘Chimney House’ series, and features a new license comparison tool, in addition to a list of fixes and enhancements. The license comparison tool ensures that users are fully aware of license changes, through a pop-up that displays the current license information and compares it to the incoming license prior to installation.

Other updates include:

  • A navigation warning that alerts the user if they attempt to navigate away from the LDAP locations page without saving.
  • The ability to perform other actions in the uberSVN UI whilst update packages are being downloaded (admins only.)
  • Apache Subversion 1.6.19 and 1.7.7 binaries shipped with all new downloads.
  • Removing LDAP locations now presents a warning and option to remove the associated users.

More information on all the changes included in this uberSVN update is available at the Release Notes.

If you’re not already using uberSVN, it’s free to download and completely free to use. Simply visit http://www.wandisco.com/ubersvn to get started.

Switching to Apache Subversion 1.7.6

Keeping up-to-date with software updates can be a time-consuming chore, but upgrading to new releases of Apache Subversion needn’t be stressful. uberSVN, the free, open ALM platform for Subversion users comes with an innovative ‘SVN Switch’ feature that allows administrators to upgrade SVN binaries with a simple mouse click and a service restart.

In this post, we’ll show you how to upgrade to Apache Subversion 1.7.6 in uberSVN, in five easy steps.

1) In your uberSVN installation, open the ‘Administration’ tab followed by the ‘SVN Switch’ tab.

2) On the ‘SVN Switch’ screen, select the ‘Subversion 1.7.6’ option.

3) Click ‘Apply.’

4) uberSVN will begin the process of changing the Subversion binaries. Note, this may take a few minutes to complete.

5) Once the binaries have been changed, uberSVN will automatically log you out. Re-enter your login details.

You’ve now successfully upgraded to Apache Subversion 1.7.6!

Need more Subversion know-how? After getting a great response from the Apache Subversion community in 2011, Subversion Live is back for 2012, bringing the Subversion community sessions covering everything from Subversion’s future, to expert-led best practices workshops, as well as the unique opportunity to meet the core Subversion committers.

Configuring Jenkins: Security

The Jenkins continuous integration system doesn’t perform any security checks by default. While this may not be a problem in certain situations, if your installation is going to be exposed to the internet (or any other untrusted environment) it’s a good idea to implement some security checks. In this example, we’ll walk you through a common setup: allowing Jenkins to maintain its own user database, and then show you how to grant a specified user with full administrative privileges.

Note, this tutorial uses Jenkins and uberSVN. uberSVN is free to download and free to use, simply visit http://www.wandisco.com/ubersvn to get started.

1) Open the ‘Jenkins’ tab in your uberSVN installation and select the ‘Manage Jenkins’ option.

2) Select the ‘Configure Systems’ option.

3) Select the ‘Enable security’ option. This will bring up some additional options.

4) Select ‘Jenkins’s own user database’ under the ‘Security Realm’ heading, and ensure the ‘Allow users to sign up’ checkbox is ticked.

5) Under ‘Authorization,’ select ‘Matrix-based security.’ This will bring up a new table.

6) In the table select ‘Overall – Read’ for anonymous users.

7) Type your username into the ‘User/group to add” box and click ‘add.’ Your username will now appear in the table.

8) Make sure every permission for your username is ticked, to give yourself full access.

9) Select the ‘Save’ button at the bottom of the page. You have now configured Jenkins’ security settings!

Need more Subversion know-how? After getting a great response from the Apache Subversion community in 2011, Subversion Live is back for 2012, bringing the Subversion community sessions covering everything from Subversion’s future, to expert-led best practices workshops, as well as the unique opportunity to meet the core Subversion committers.

Apache Subversion 1.7.6 Arrives

Apache Subversion 1.7.6 has been released, bringing even more fixes and enhancements to the world’s most popular open source version control system.

Here is just some of what’s new and noteworthy in the 1.7.6 release:

  • A fix for running tests against httpd version 2.4
  • Constant struct initialisers now used for C89 compatibility
  • Fixes for the output of ‘svn propget -R’ ‘svn proplist’ and ‘svn status’
  • Optimized ‘svn upgrade’ performance on large working copies
  • A fix for ‘svn upgrade’ on working copies with certain tree conflicts
  • Fixes for two asserts into errors for TortoiseSVN

More information on what’s new in Subversion 1.7.6 can be found in the Changes file.

As always, the latest, certified binaries can be downloaded for free from the WANdisco website, and are also available through the award winning, open uberSVN platform. Upgrading to Subversion 1.7.6 is made easy with uberSVN, which features an innovative svnSWITCH tool for moving between the different binaries.

If you want all the latest news, tips, tricks and best practices on Apache Subversion, then why not check out Subversion Live 2012, the series of dedicated Subversion conferences? This year, events will be taking place in London, San Francisco and Greenwich, Connecticut, and will feature a unique mix of sessions, expert-led best practices workshops and invaluable networking opportunities for the SVN community.

Jenkins: Configuring a Proxy

In most setups, the Jenkins server is behind a firewall, which can be a problem as Jenkins requires internet access to download plugins and updates. If you need to go through an HTTP proxy server, the connection details can easily be configured in Jenkins’ ‘Manage Plugins’ tab.

Note, this tutorial uses uberSVN. If you don’t already have uberSVN, you can download it for free from http://ubersvn.com/

1) Open the ‘Jenkins’ tab of your uberSVN installation.

2) Select the ‘Manage Jenkins’ link.

3) Click the ‘Manage Plugins’ link.

4) In the ‘Plugin Manager’ open the ‘Advanced’ tab. This will bring up your HTTP Proxy information. Enter the appropriate info – such as port, server, etc. – and click ‘Submit.’

Jenkins will now have internet access, and will be able to download updates and plugins.

Updating Jenkins

To download Jenkins plugins, simply click the ‘Available’ tab of the ‘Plugin Manager’ to see a list of available plugins.

Updates for your installed plugins can be found in the adjoining ‘Updates’ tab.

Once you’ve configured internet access, you’ll have access to updates for Jenkins itself. To check for Jenkins updates:

1) Open the ‘Administration’ tab, followed by the ‘Updates’ tab.

2) Click the ‘Check for Updates’ tab to ensure you have all the latest updates.

3) You will then be able to see – and install – all the latest Jenkins updates.

Not yet started with uberSVN? It’s free to download, free to use and integrates seamlessly with Jenkins. Simply visit http://www.ubersvn.com/ to find out more.

Need more Subversion know-how? After getting a great response from the Apache Subversion community in 2011, Subversion Live is back for 2012, bringing the Subversion community sessions covering everything from Subversion’s future, to expert-led best practices workshops, as well as the unique opportunity to meet the core Subversion committers.

uberSVN Update for ‘Chimney House’ Users

We’re pleased to announce an update to uberSVN ‘Chimney House’ that includes a new and improved manageAPPS page and LDAP enhancements.

uberSVN ‘Chimney House’ 3 features plenty of improvements, including:

  • Improvements to uberSVN APIs and internal development of uberSVN SDK (public release coming soon!)
  • New manageAPPS page allows you to see metadata attached to your APP license, such as expiry date, number of named users, and more.
  • Further improvements to the way uberSVN handles LDAP and LDAPS.
  • The latest Apache Subversion 1.7.5 binaries set to active by default.
  • A list of bug fixes, including some fixes and alignment of the uberSVN Access Control Team Leader and uberSVN Delegated Team Admin (where uberSVN Access Control is active)

You may have already heard, but with the latest release of Chimney House, we’re splitting uberSVN’s release cycle into two distinct phases. At least a few weeks before an update is released to the entire uberSVN user base, we’ll be giving our Latest Release Channel users a sneak preview of upcoming features and functionality. These users will get to test new features and see how they fit into the ALM environment before the update becomes widely available. Interested? Check out our blog post announcing the Latest Release Channel for more info.

For the full list of bug fixes, new features and improvements in uberSVN ‘Chimney House’ Release 3, see our Release Notes.

Not yet using uberSVN? It can be downloaded for free from http://www.ubersvn.com/

avatar

About rbudas

Rob Budas has over 25 years of software industry experience, with the last 15 years focused on the Software Configuration Management sector. Prior to joining WANdisco, Rob had worked at IBM Rational for 8 years where he was a Sr. Product Manager for Rational ClearCase. He has held various development, technical sales and product management roles throughout his career. Rob holds a Bachelor of Science in Computer and Communication Science from the University of Michigan.